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Thread: Need Cleaning Advice

  1. #1
    Musculation Master Jokubas's Avatar
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    Need Cleaning Advice

    I might be going through an old house soon, and it's got a lot of stuff. I already know there's a He-Man puzzle. I'm planning on keeping that, but a lot of this other stuff is going to have to go.

    The problem I'm running into is that there's a lot of stuff, and some of it is probably going to be worth something. I'd be anxious about managing stuff to sell on ebay in small numbers, but it probably wouldn't even be feasible.

    Has anyone had any experience with this? What's the best way to go through a large amount of stuff?
    Last edited by Master Jokubas; September 24, 2016 at 07:40pm.

  2. #2
    Heroic Warrior nicholighkun's Avatar
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    No experience, but I'd say it depends on your personality. For me, I would start by clearing out a single room, and spreading out from there, so that the progress is noticeable, and that would inspire me to drudge on. Unless you're the type to let the carrot on the stick (the finished project) be your motivation, in which case I'd jump around from room to room without finishing one until a larger amount of progress has been completed on the whole.

    Depending on my resolve for the project, and available time, I would either pick a small easy room (if I was dreading the work, or if time was limited in the beginning), or else I'd start with the biggest obstacle, and overcome that early (if I was raring to go and or had the time to devote to one of the more time consuming rooms).
    Last edited by nicholighkun; September 24, 2016 at 09:38pm.

  3. #3
    Musculation Master Jokubas's Avatar
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    I'd probably start out with a single small room, but the hardest thing is what to do with everything. There's a lot I could throw out that might be worth a little bit, but not worth the trouble of actually selling it. However, there's going to be some things that are probably worth selling, but I have no idea how to discern that, manage it, or get it done, especially on this scale.

  4. #4
    Heroic Warrior nicholighkun's Avatar
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    You could always separate the things you know are valuable enough to be worth the trouble, and the things you know are not worth it, then do a film, or a set of pics of everything else (the things you're not sure of), post it to the .org (and any other forums you're a member of) and hope for some input from the community to educate you quickly. Assuming they actually reply in a timely manner, which may not happen.

    I'd say the best thing to do, if you take my above suggestion, is to save the link to the thread where you show off the stuff into your signature, and just be active in the community, so that everyone who sees your comments in other sections of the forum will have a better shot at seeing what you're doing.

  5. #5
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    No experience here either. But I would agree with a room at a time.

    I would NOT go in with the notion "I've got a day and a half to do it". Take a Friday off and make a long weekend of it. Or let's see how fast I can do this.

    You could try selling an item or two here.

    As for the toys put them in long term storage and worry about selling them next spring.

    Quote Originally Posted by nicholighkun View Post
    No experience, but I'd say it depends on your personality. For me, I would start by clearing out a single room, and spreading out from there, so that the progress is noticeable, and that would inspire me to drudge on. Unless you're the type to let the carrot on the stick (the finished project) be your motivation, in which case I'd jump around from room to room without finishing one until a larger amount of progress has been completed on the whole.

    Depending on my resolve for the project, and available time, I would either pick a small easy room (if I was dreading the work, or if time was limited in the beginning), or else I'd start with the biggest obstacle, and overcome that early (if I was raring to go and or had the time to devote to one of the more time consuming rooms).

  6. #6
    Master of New Adventures!
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    Here's the best advice you'll ever get about big cleaning jobs, whether it's rooms, garages or basements:

    First, make three piles. The most important thing is to react immediately, without thinking about it. Pile 1 is stuff you know you are definitely going to want to keep. Pile 2 is junk and stuff you haven't touched in a year. Throw it into a garbage can as you work. Pile 3 is stuff you're not sure about. After you've put away things from Pile 1, go back to Pile 3 and carefully go through it. Save what you want and toss what you don't. In this manner you'll end up throwing out about 50% of your stuff -- much of it useless and without value -- while saving things you really like and can focus on.

  7. #7
    Drinking NaughtyNurse IPA TheDeviot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heeeere's Olesker! View Post
    Here's the best advice you'll ever get about big cleaning jobs, whether it's rooms, garages or basements:

    First, make three piles. The most important thing is to react immediately, without thinking about it. Pile 1 is stuff you know you are definitely going to want to keep. Pile 2 is junk and stuff you haven't touched in a year. Throw it into a garbage can as you work. Pile 3 is stuff you're not sure about. After you've put away things from Pile 1, go back to Pile 3 and carefully go through it. Save what you want and toss what you don't. In this manner you'll end up throwing out about 50% of your stuff -- much of it useless and without value -- while saving things you really like and can focus on.
    I would say save anything salvageable. Then make a pile of stuff to sell/donate. and one of stuff to keep. My grandmother was a pack rat. When she moved, and the family was cleaning the house out, my aunt would have tossed so many valuable things. My brother, and I salvaged them, and donated the stuff in great shape.
    I made a barista who loved Disney happy giving her all of the ceramic Christmas set pieces that would have been thrown away. Some of them went for $70 in any condition at the time.
    Just because you have to part with it, doesn't mean you should have it end up in a landfill. Let it bring joy to someone else.

    Also if you find any video game things check out pricecharting. A lot of retro stores use it to determine approx. what to sell old games for. So if you were to privately sell it off
    you could price below it, and still come away w something. Again, better than the landfill.
    The Deviot
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  8. #8
    Master of New Adventures!
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDeviot View Post
    I would say save anything salvageable. Then make a pile of stuff to sell/donate. and one of stuff to keep. My grandmother was a pack rat. When she moved, and the family was cleaning the house out, my aunt would have tossed so many valuable things. My brother, and I salvaged them, and donated the stuff in great shape.
    I made a barista who loved Disney happy giving her all of the ceramic Christmas set pieces that would have been thrown away. Some of them went for $70 in any condition at the time.
    Just because you have to part with it, doesn't mean you should have it end up in a landfill. Let it bring joy to someone else.

    Also if you find any video game things check out pricecharting. A lot of retro stores use it to determine approx. what to sell old games for. So if you were to privately sell it off
    you could price below it, and still come away w something. Again, better than the landfill.

    Excellent point. In a sense we do this for the big jobs -- we tackled our garage a few weeks ago -- because our handyman carts away everything we want to toss. He keeps what he wants and sells much of the other stuff. The reality, however, is that not everything is salvageable and some things just have to be tossed. No one wants ballpoint pens that are out of ink -- don't ask why we didn't toss them years ago -- a pair of golf shoes so worn that no human being would be caught dead in them or old, bent screens that we used to use on windows we had replaced five years ago.

    As an aside, the deal we have with him -- which makes both of us happy -- is that he works with me to sort through the stuff and keeps everything we're tossing in return for what his fee would be for the job.
    Last edited by Heeeere's Olesker!; September 25, 2016 at 08:24pm.

  9. #9
    Musculation Master Jokubas's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone, there's a lot of good advice here.

    Does anyone have suggestions on where best to sell or donate things? I know that can vary regionally, but right now I just want to get a better idea.

  10. #10
    Heroic Warrior Amentep's Avatar
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    There are probably a number of local stores, charities or recycling organizations that may take stuff (depending on what it is).

    Two national places that might have a local location -

    Half-Price Books (120 stores in the US) buys hardbacks, paperbacks, new or old; music in most formats, including CDs and LPs; movies, magazines, audiobooks, video games, game consoles, accessories, e-readers; and collectible books, music, and ephemera.
    https://www.hpb.com/how-it-works#buying-faq
    https://www.hpb.com/stores

    Goodwill Industries is a national charity with numerous local chapters that takes donation (donations can be tax deductible) and sells them in their stores with an eye for helping people improve their prospects and/or find permanent employment. https://www.goodwill.org/donate-and-shop/donate-stuff/

  11. #11
    Master of New Adventures!
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    Salvation Army is a good place and a good organization.

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