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Thread: MOTUC at Retail Discussion/Speculation/Support Thread

  1. #351
    Heroic Warrior Nianotreve's Avatar
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    No please NO MOTUC at Retail - The UK won't get them, (just like the TRU 2 packs) Keep it online, just imporve the service
    If there's something strange in the neighbourhood, who you gonna' call? HE-MAN!!!!

  2. #352
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    While even case ratios would be nice, there really needs to be two case configurations... say each wave is 6 figures. The first configuration would be either a 6 or 12 pack evenly distributed. This gets the variety on the shelf. Each figure is entered in the system as a sparate UPC. Thus as the figures sell, the retailer can order cases of 1 figure, say qty 4 or 6. This way they can get popular figures restocked without having to order figures that would clog the pegs. In this scenario, collectors could order the initial case if they were completists as well.

  3. #353
    Heroic Warrior goluphi's Avatar
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    I've come to the realization lately that people have some wacky expectations for what MOTUC at retail would look like. If, by some miracle, the MOTUC line as it is was reprinted, and shipped to retailers with the same paint apps/accessories (very low chance of this happening - much more likely to see a new line for a movie or whatever, but that's besides the point), I don't think it would be anything like what people would like to see. I think the biggest issue is character selection. I think people would expect to see all their favorite obscure favorites on the shelves, but I think people on these forums must have forgotten the nightmare of toy shelves after 4 years of having figures delivered to their door via subscription. So, I made a funny little image to illustrate my point:

    Hey, if you want to wallow in the negative, go nuts. Sure, things aren’t absolutely perfect, and people passionate about a property can get all keyed up about things. But I don’t collect toys to be miserable. So I’d rather think about the things that do excite me
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  4. #354
    Heroic Warrior Fabulous's Avatar
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    I would think if they did go to retail they'd be smart and only do 4-8 characters with similar paint aps and 1 accessory. New packaging would be the only think that would make me buy them again
    10-15-2011 1:30pm Eastern
    The MOTUC line and all its fans were taken for the ass

    Let us never forget.

  5. #355
    Heroic Warrior DJ Force's Avatar
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    I am positive MOTUC WOULD work at retail, here´s why and how YOU can contribute

    So I just posted this at the matty forums, but I thought why not post it to the .org as well.

    I want to encourage all of you to do similar stunts if possible. Cause what MOTUC is missing is not a movie year, a (good) comic book or a cartoon show. It´s faith. And faith for the suits at Mattel does not come free of anything, but of proof.

    Here´s what I did last weekend.




    Let me begin this posting with a few pictures I took last weekend:





    This was "Eagle Con", the first AFN organized geek-culture event at the Kaiserslautern Military Community Center on Ramstein Airbase, Germany. Right in the middle of the malls food court.
    Aside from the Star Wars 501st cosplay group, Aliens vs. Predator collectors and some seriously dope Warhammer dudes, my wife and I had been invited to set up a MOTU booth. And so we did.







    In addition to my custom lifesize props and some merchandise, I also set up a battle-scene between the Defenders, Skeletors troops, the Snakemen and the Horde:


    And this is where the fun began.
    The convention was open for the public 10am to 6pm, and in addition to the twentysomething geeks attending the con itself, a gazillion of people came by and their eyes widened at the sight of the beauty that is MOTUC. Every 5 minutes something like this happened:

    Son: "Daddy, those figures are SOOOOOOO cool! Can I have one?"
    Sometimes dad came first, saying
    Dad: "Son, these are the toys that I played with when I was your age."
    to which son would reply: "They are SOOOOOO cool! Can I have one?"
    To which I usually had to reply "Unfortunatly, no. They can only be bought at Mattels own internet store", which in return resulted in sadness with both son AND dad.
    Even mothers and girls came by and their eyes also widened:


    What should give this story an even bigger impact is the fact that these were casual people. Not nerds, not geeks, not comic-con visitors, not cosplayers.
    Not your usual target audience that has to be lured into visiting the MOTU booth at a huge convention floor, visiting the respective convention for so many other reasons than MOTU.
    And most certainly nobody that already knew about the existance of MOTUC because they visit geek websites or SDCC.
    But "ordinary" parents and kids that were immediatly drawn to the MOTU booth and instantly fell in love with the toys.

    All this happened without any kind of comic, cartoon, movie or other media backup.
    This happened because MOTUC toys are pure awesomeness and still appeal to kids, be they young or grown up.
    In addition, what kicked in now is what Mattel officially considered the "dad-factor" back in 2002 in their manuals.
    2002, a time when those "dads" that Mattel was hoping for were in their early twenties, being lucky to have moved into their first own apartment,
    enjoying life and faaar away from even thinking about having kids, let alone having kids in the age that they would be playing with MOTU toys.
    • NOW is the right time.
    • NOW the kids of the 80ies are parents.
    • NOW we have kids the same age we were when we played with MOTU in our childhood.
    • NOW is the time kids want MOTU if they only had the chance.
    • And NOW is the time we want to give MOTU to our kids.



    So, the question is:
    What would it take to convince Mattels upper management to have the same faith in their own properties that not only your customers already have, but also those that desperatly try to become your customers?



    MOTU is strong. Always has been, always will be. And MOTUC is the perfect vehicle to appeal to kids of all ages, young kids and adult kids alike.
    There is no need for a "movie year" or a very gritty and gory comicbook kids won´t be allowed to read anyway. And there is no need for a cartoon.
    It´s the toys that "have the power"!
    Positivity, folks!
    Let´s all agree to love MOTU enough to let others love MOTU, too!

  6. #356
    HAAAAAAAAAPPYYYYYYYY..... Prince Adam's Dad's Avatar
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    I have to disagree with your conclusions. The kind of people who would seek out an attend a convention are not necessarily those who are populating Toys R Us' aisles.

    Sales of action figures are undeniably on the descent. MOTUC is actually ahead of its time, as I believe that action figures in general will be almost exclusively a niche market sooner rather than later.
    Sadly, you can't divorce emotion from a toyline built on nostalgia.


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  7. #357
    Heroic Warrior goluphi's Avatar
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    It's cool that you set this up, you obviously love the brand and want to see it succeed. But your evidence is (at best) anecdotal. Boy's action figures have only been doing worse at retail. I think MOTU is still a viable brand. But convincing suits at retailers and suits at Mattel that MOTU is still a viable brand will take more than anecdotal stories of children (who as we know have flighty interests). It will take a popular movie, game, TV show, or other form of media to convince them.
    Hey, if you want to wallow in the negative, go nuts. Sure, things aren’t absolutely perfect, and people passionate about a property can get all keyed up about things. But I don’t collect toys to be miserable. So I’d rather think about the things that do excite me
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  8. #358
    Heroic Warrior DJ Force's Avatar
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    You need to read more carefully, man.


    I specifically mentioned that IN ADDITION to the twentysomething geek con-visitors, the majority of visitors were casual people. Because the event was placed in the food court of the airbase´s mall. There were app. 2500 to 5000 people going in and out of the mall and none of them was your regular convention visitor.
    This is SPECIFICALLY why my posting and my conclusions are the very same as yours, actually. And why last weekends event had such an impact on my faith that the MOTUC figures would most definetly sell at retail.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Gosh.

    And I am telling you otherwise. So it´s my believe, backed by direct experience against yours AND the suits´. MOTU doesn´t need media backup. MOTU needs to be available! Air a few cool commercials to get boys crazy about the toys and they won´t even have to drag their parents to the toy aisles. Because their dads will be more than curious to check out those "brand new toys that look exactly like the ones they played with".

    Mattel had the exact same faith 11 years ago. They even mentioned the "dad-factor" in their retailer info brochures and came to the very same conclusion. But they were 10 years too early. They counted on parents willingly giving their kids those toys they played with when they were kids, but even though they were perfectly right in their assumption, there just weren´t any parents around! NOW they are.
    Positivity, folks!
    Let´s all agree to love MOTU enough to let others love MOTU, too!

  9. #359
    Color'licious! JVS3's Avatar
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    Who knows, it might do well! Anything is possible. But, my big fear is that casual interest factor.

    I see things at SDCC all the time that I think are really awesome and I'll even go up and gush over them. But I'd never buy or collect them. IMO, a lot of people come up and check things out but would never actually purchase it.

    Here's hoping, though. Maybe one day it'll return to retail. It would be great to see it in the toy aisle.

  10. #360
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    The MOTUC we know and love wouldn't work at a retail level. Something would have to change that would drastically alter the model of the line that we've been able to collect over the last 5 years. Whether it be paint, accessories, scale...something would change and they wouldn't be the MOTUC. Maybe still MOTU in some form, but not MOTUC. I don't even want to think of what these would cost at a retail store(no Big Lots jokes, please).

  11. #361
    Heroic Warrior DJ Force's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goluphi View Post
    children (who as we know have flighty interests)
    And with this statement I respectfully, but wholeheartly disagree. If kids have flightly interests, it´s because how parents raise them.
    Positivity, folks!
    Let´s all agree to love MOTU enough to let others love MOTU, too!

  12. #362
    Heroic Warrior WDWFreak53's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Force View Post
    You need to read more carefully, man.


    I specifically mentioned that IN ADDITION to the twentysomething geek con-visitors, the majority of visitors were casual people. Because the event was placed in the food court of the airbase´s mall. There were app. 2500 to 5000 people going in and out of the mall and none of them was your regular convention visitor.
    This is SPECIFICALLY why my posting and my conclusions are the very same as yours, actually. And why last weekends event had such an impact on my faith that the MOTUC figures would most definetly sell at retail.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Gosh.

    And I am telling you otherwise. So it´s my believe, backed by direct experience against yours AND the suits´. MOTU doesn´t need media backup. MOTU needs to be available! Air a few cool commercials to get boys crazy about the toys and they won´t even have to drag their parents to the toy aisles. Because their dads will be more than curious to check out those "brand new toys that look exactly like the ones they played with".

    Mattel had the exact same faith 11 years ago. They even mentioned the "dad-factor" in their retailer info brochures and came to the very same conclusion. But they were 10 years too early. They counted on parents willingly giving their kids those toys they played with when they were kids, but even though they were perfectly right in their assumption, there just weren´t any parents around! NOW they are.
    Putting them on display as people walk by is different than having them on a peg in a store filled with a ton of other figures.
    You set them up in a cool way in a place with a lot of foot traffic. You can't do that at retail. You have an allotted space in an aisle.

    While I'd love to agree with you, I must agree with the others that this is a dying hobby as far as "new kids" go.

  13. #363
    Heroic Warrior byinfernoslight's Avatar
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    The advantage you had is that you were able to have all the toys out on display in battle poses with, presumably, little in the way of other 'child-appropriate' toys around. You can't do that in Toys R Us, where they'd be sat in packaging amongst a million other toys that children have had far more exposure to. In that situation is a child going to pick the figure he's seen in a cartoon or one he's never heard of?

    --------

    WDWFreak53 beat me to it making exactly the same point!
    Last edited by byinfernoslight; November 20, 2013 at 08:17am.

  14. #364
    Heroic Warrior DJ Force's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DVD View Post
    The MOTUC we know and love wouldn't work at a retail level. Something would have to change that would drastically alter the model of the line that we've been able to collect over the last 5 years. Whether it be paint, accessories, scale...something would change and they wouldn't be the MOTUC. Maybe still MOTU in some form, but not MOTUC. I don't even want to think of what these would cost at a retail store(no Big Lots jokes, please).
    ...and I respectfully have to disagree with this statement, too. Think of the production quota for a second. Right now Mattel only serves the subscribers and a handful casual buyers. The lower the number, the higher the price we have to pay. We´ve been told this for the past 5 years and it is a fact.
    But this fact works the other way round, too. The higher the production quota, the lower the price can be. Compare MOTUC to Star Wars Black 6". Same size, lots of detail, articulation and accessories, $20 pricetag. MOTUC can easily do the same.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by byinfernoslight View Post
    The advantage you had is that you were able to have all the toys out on display in battle poses with, presumably, little in the way of other 'child-appropriate' toys around. You can't do that in Toys R Us, where they'd be sat in packaging amongst a million other toys that children have had far more exposure to. In that situation is a child going to pick the figure he's seen in a cartoon or one he's never heard of?
    The convention was in the food court of a mall. There was also a toy store in the mall. Kids would still come back to the MOTUC table again and again (one particularly interested kid in a Michelangelo sweater stuck around for at least 2 hours). They didn´t buy anything in the toystore, but both parents and kids alike asked me over and over again if they could buy MOTU toys.
    And please keep in mind that a very impressive STAR WARS booth was right next to mine. And STILL they all came to examine the MOTU table.

    And yes, I am well aware of the fact that space in the toy aisles won´t be enough for setups. This is why I was asking you to try and do the same as I did!
    If there´s a local event, ask the organizers if you can set up a table with toys, for an "80ies flashback". At best they are in our age and will love the idea of a "retro-booth". At least that´s exactly what happened with me In fact, I have already been invited for two events next year.

    But my range of operation is limited. So try to do the same. If you love the brand, do something. I know it´s not our responsibility. It´s not our job. It´s Mattels. But Mattel as of now seems to not have any faith, so WE need to become the Steve Sansweets of MOTU. We need to be the ambassadors of MOTU. We need to spread the word. And maybe one day we will convince Mattel to have faith again in their property.




    ...and now please stop the nay-saying and negative vibes. I shared this story in good mood and for some positivity. Not for haters to hate
    Last edited by DJ Force; November 20, 2013 at 08:29am.
    Positivity, folks!
    Let´s all agree to love MOTU enough to let others love MOTU, too!

  15. #365
    grumpy old dragon scott metzger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DVD View Post
    The MOTUC we know and love wouldn't work at a retail level. Something would have to change that would drastically alter the model of the line that we've been able to collect over the last 5 years. Whether it be paint, accessories, scale...something would change and they wouldn't be the MOTUC. Maybe still MOTU in some form, but not MOTUC. I don't even want to think of what these would cost at a retail store(no Big Lots jokes, please).
    Only because that's the way Mattel would approach it. MOTU could have a chance at retail exactly as it is, a collector's line, like NECA's stuff. TRU is carrying figures based on Gremlins II, for crying out loud, which not only hasn't had any new media since it came out, but was pretty widely panned. It is a niche market, but that doesn't mean it's not a viable venue. The line would tend toward the specialty shops and TRU, with Wally World and Target likely passing, but it is a model that works for smaller companies that don't have Mattel's distribution network already set up. With the added resources Mattel already has in place, it would be quite possible.

    What folks are saying about action figures (and traditional toys in general) is true; the market and window for selling to kids is shrinking. That's why Mattel needs to look at building something like the collector's market. It may not bring in Monster High level sales, but they need to start laying a solid foundation in other areas, because someday not too far off, Monster High won't be bringing in MH level sales. Mattycollector was such a move, and a good one in theory. It was bungled horrendously in practice (and let's face it, that's being kind), but it was a viable idea, as proven by the unprecedented success of the MOTUC line (and, yes, the line has been a success; it's natural decline was simply hastened by a badly run website and shortsighted marketing decisions). You not only have to look at the bottom line on such things, you have to look down the line with some vision, and realize that a smaller profit now could lay the groundwork for more solid and reliable profits later. Media driven merchandise is the main force in the industry now, and that's basically a roller coaster ride, with sales peaking and dipping as the properties move on. It's core brands like MOTU or even Monster High that the company controls that are the real bread and butter, the reliable, consistent sales that keep the company going and stockholders happy. I think the industry is going to have to swing back in that direction to survive the long haul, and that means looking at different routes for the product. Things like a properly run Matty and a focus on the collectors with disposable income are going to be important parts of that.
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  16. #366
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    Yet they litter the toy section with Max Steel and 6 inch figures that don't move at all because no one knows what it is or it's too overpriced.

    Also, they would make tons of He-Man variants that won't sell but will tell us that's how it works at retail that kids don't want bad guys to interact with the good guys, which never makes any sense in any toy line.

    And your fighting a loosing battle about the line working at retail, some people here believe what Scott says 100%.

  17. #367
    Heroic Warrior wyldman11's Avatar
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    Cost is an issue with action figures, in the 80s He-man cost like 3 bucks a figure at retail based on similar lines at retail he would cost 15 bucks. Movies and games haven't gone up that much.

    DCUC and Marvel Legends are probably the closest in comparison and yes Batman, Superman and some of the other big name characters sold out really fast. Probably about half the others sold decently, while others pegwarmed. One of those is no longer at retail in favor of a more retail friendly line, and the other comes and goes. Also aside from Star Wars Unleashed Statues and the current Black series, Star Wars figures can't compare to MOTUC. Yes the small figures do have a pretty good amount of detail in them, but it's a size issue bigger action figures are larger than life and allow for more detail.

    Thundercats did start strong and partially because of brand mismanagement the line died pretty quickly. (there were other issues like adults buying stuff pretty quickly getting it home and going meeh not as good as MOTUC or other higher end product).

    As Val said, it's hard to know for sure. Adult collectors and fans are easy to get as long as you have a decent product, but the more casual you get the more fickle they get. As I have said before there have been really good movies, toys, games, and other things that should have done well but were overshadowed by another product at the time or at that time didn't appeal the masses. So hard to say if it would or wouldn't, I would love for it to though.

    One last thing, Germay =/= United States where the product is made. Look at the difference in the metal scenes (music) in the two places.
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  18. #368
    Heroic Warrior
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    200x effectively failed at retail. I know that people blame the He-Man and Skeletor variants, but do we have any hard data to prove that?? I've never seen any. I could have missed it, but so much of that blame seems to be from adult fans who were sad they could never find Evil-Lyn, Roboto, and others.

    He-Man has been out of the general public consciousness for so long that its going to take a much bigger media presence to bring in new fans. Transformers, in essence, never went off the air. Then it got 3 blockbuster movies. He-Man got a cartoon in 200x that failed to attract an audience. Why? Well, we can blame part of it on inconsistent scheduling. But we cannot neglect the fact that the general populace may not be as apt to notice something on CN as we might think because we're fans.

    We need a blockbuster movie. That will introduce people to the property, and it will also draw in the more causal fans who played with He-Man as kids and forgot about him because of the decades of no solid and popular media presence. Until then, hopes of MOTU of succeeding at general retail are, unfortunately, without a good foundation. The comics and video game are cool and help, but they only grab people who are already aware of the property and haven't effectively forgotten it.
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  19. #369
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    Yeah they never have big cases with figures in battle scenes at Toys R Us, oh wait they do in the building blocks section.

    No one in the action figure section decides to do so anymore and Mattel certainly wouldn't understand how to do such a thing, they don't like to advertise their products.

  20. #370
    Assimilate, or else!! krosfyah's Avatar
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    I'm right there with you DJ Force.
    I understand that it requires a big investment from the retail side and the manufacturers side, but just removing that equation, I believe 100% that MOTU sold right will be huge. The designs are appealing, the story is appealing it has everything that kids will be drawn too. People say "oh it's just anecdotal evidence" but that is still evidence and that is how Mattel runs their focus groups. so why is it denounced when someone else posts that?

    My friend's 3 year old niece's favourite show was filmation's he-man and now it's filmation's she-ra. I never interact with her, no one in her life is or was the he-man fan I am, she saw he-man on a local station and fell in love. sure that's one kid, but it's still a kid.

    I've heard kids recently yelling "I HAVE THE POWEEEER!" the argument that 'kids don't like toys anymore" is based on toy companies believing this and not selling them toys like they used to. When we were kids toys weren't an endless run of variants, but that changed in the 90s because the toy company changed their philosophy.

    at this moment we can say vide games aren't for kids. the latest systems are $250 - $500, new games are $50-$70 the biggest sellers are rated Mature. How is that a kids market? so the video game argument is 'consoles are dead, apps are the new thing for kids" but guess what, kids like to play, and if you allow kids to discover play, they will make toys and game and fun out of what they enjoy. kids still DO love toys, but many parents leave tv video games and apps to babysit them and shut them up.

    Christmas is coming, there aren't any "app" drives to give to less fortunate kids, they have TOY drives. We have to start having faith in kids ability to use their imaginations and give them the opportunities to do so. Kids aren't much different than we were, they are however suffering under helicopter parents, tiger moms, paranoia about more dangerous conditions outside and corporations that are WAAAAY more greedy than they've ever been, and that last part in my opinion is one of the BIGGEST reasons toys don't sell like they used to. making a profit isn't enough anymore, you have to always do better than your last quarter, you have to cut costs cut jobs and cut variety.

    anyhoooo, I agree with DJ Force 100% the only thing stopping MOTU from being huge is Mattel.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Skystalker View Post
    200x effectively failed at retail. I know that people blame the He-Man and Skeletor variants, but do we have any hard data to prove that?? I've never seen any.
    in 2002 Mattel's 4th quarter report DIRECTLY cited the success of MOTU as being a key factor in their strong growth, the short packing and other issues came I think in the 2nd quarter of the following year, that's when the fanbase started warning Jeremy Padawar (the brand manager at the time) that the cases were packed poorly, 5 he-mans and 1 beastman for example) they didn't listen until the fourth quarter of that year when they announced new case ratios, but that only lasted for older figures, not too long after that we saw so many variants, and again many were packed out in the 5:1 case ratio.

    Then they announced the snakemen and snake armour he-man and Val said he-man needs pants to appeal to kids, even though in 2002 the line and show were bonafide hits while he-man showed his bare legs) and Jeremy said the snakemen are here to save Eternia. Well SA he-man was extremely hard to find, the case ratios were still bad and soon enough people gave up.

    so sure, my story here doesn't have footnotes or links to back up what I say, but this all happened, it was a huge source of frustration in 2003 and beyond.
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  21. #371
    Heroic Warrior goluphi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krosfyah View Post
    corporations that are WAAAAY more greedy than they've ever been, and that last part in my opinion is one of the BIGGEST reasons toys don't sell like they used to. making a profit isn't enough anymore, you have to always do better than your last quarter, you have to cut costs cut jobs and cut variety.
    This is true, not only are they more greedy, they are also much more risk averse. Especially toy stores. It used to be that toy stores wanted to serve the customers by having shelves full of product. No longer. The paradigm now is to order as little as possible, and sell through it as fast as possible. Any product that lingers on the shelves is looked down upon. If they had their way, all toy stores would be 100% empty all the time.

    This is completely contrary to the 80s/early 90s when toy stores kept stocked shelves so that people could come in and actually buy product. I remember it was much easier to get into a toy line when I was a kid, because you could just go to the toy store, and get what you wanted. Rarely was it that when figures sold out, they didn't produce more. Now, if you're not there when they open the cases, you're not getting anything, unless the toy line is either over produced, or underdemanded.
    Hey, if you want to wallow in the negative, go nuts. Sure, things aren’t absolutely perfect, and people passionate about a property can get all keyed up about things. But I don’t collect toys to be miserable. So I’d rather think about the things that do excite me
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  22. #372
    Awesome Warrior Alexx's Avatar
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    I'd be on this if so many cool toys didn't die off left and right. But hey, you're right: This COULD do well. There's just no chance with the folks who own it. Mattel isn't alone, either. SOMETHING needs to change in the toy market, but I have no idea what, and I don't think any of the big name companies know either.

    I mean, you produce higher runs of these figures and the price will go down: yes. Maybe it would go back to 20 again? I don't know. The Black Series of Star Wars is 20 and it just...doesn't feel right. Not sure why. But I'm not sure about their production numbers. If MotUC started producing retail numbers, I have no idea how much it would go down. Whatever that price may be, it won't be below 20. Couldn't be - not with that much plastic and in today's market. Is that enough to get folks to buy that for their kids?

    More and more I hear this in the toy isles: "Well he/she has a pile of toys and all they do is sit in front of the tv and play video games" or something of the sort. Why spend that much on a toy when you could get another game for the same amount (depending on where you go and how old it is) and get more use out of it? Now, of course, I have no solid data and I'm only going on the same info that you're getting: people passing by. I can't say that's evidence.

    I guess, to answer your main question: It would take A LOT to convince Mattel's upper management. You have to change minds that are convinced that the data they are getting from the current online market is true for more than just the online market. They won't want to take the risk of a high-run toyline out in retail. Just look at how they deal with 200X! "NO 200X STYLE!" Why? What are they afraid of? It was a failed toyline! So they don't want any of that "poison", and if this current toyline is on the decline, then they won't want to take the chance.

    Don't get me wrong...if they tried and it WORKED, then i'd slap my own face and shake your hand. I just have no idea what it would take to convince Mattel to take the chance.
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  23. #373
    Heroic Master of 200X MegaGearMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skystalker View Post
    200x effectively failed at retail. I know that people blame the He-Man and Skeletor variants, but do we have any hard data to prove that?? I've never seen any. I could have missed it, but so much of that blame seems to be from adult fans who were sad they could never find Evil-Lyn, Roboto, and others.
    That goes hand in hand with the variants. The new characters were one per case. While people brought the rare secondary characters, they left the variants on the pegs creating overstock. Cartoon Network being involved didn't help.

    He-Man has been out of the general public consciousness for so long that its going to take a much bigger media presence to bring in new fans. Transformers, in essence, never went off the air. Then it got 3 blockbuster movies. He-Man got a cartoon in 200x that failed to attract an audience. Why? Well, we can blame part of it on inconsistent scheduling. But we cannot neglect the fact that the general populace may not be as apt to notice something on CN as we might think because we're fans.
    Although Generation 2 and Machine Wars tried to keep Transformers relevant in the early 90's, Transformers had to come back from an extremely low point after G1 died. It took Beast Wars and subsequent lines with cartoons (Beast Machines, Robots in Disguise, Armada, Energon, Cybertron), video games (the Armada game for PS2) and comic book success (Pat Lee's Dreamwave's TF comics outsold X-Men for a few months) to bring the franchise back to prominence. Then the movies came 9 years after Beast Wars left the air.

    We need a blockbuster movie. That will introduce people to the property, and it will also draw in the more causal fans who played with He-Man as kids and forgot about him because of the decades of no solid and popular media presence. Until then, hopes of MOTU of succeeding at general retail are, unfortunately, without a good foundation. The comics and video game are cool and help, but they only grab people who are already aware of the property and haven't effectively forgotten it.
    There are alternatives to a live action movie. I think a popular television cartoon/retail toyline could also do this like the Hub's My Little Pony and the Nick TMNT. Mattel needs to go with a station that won't screw them over like Cartoon Network does. A GOOD video game on actual consoles can grab lots of media attention.

    The Blonde Teela (Battleground and Alcala Teela) Thread
    The Cloak and Dagger Evil-Lyn (The Real 200X Evil-Lyn) Thread
    MegaGearMax's 200X/MYP Screen Grabs

    Oo-Larr • Sagitar • Cloak and Dagger Evil-Lyn • 200X Prince Adam • 200X Sorceress • Ninjor • Tung Lashor • Sssqueeze • Angella • Perfuma • Mermista • Evilseed (MYP)

  24. #374
    Heroic Warrior wyldman11's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krosfyah View Post


    Then they announced the snakemen and snake armour he-man and Val said he-man needs pants to appeal to kids, even though in 2002 the line and show were bonafide hits while he-man showed his bare legs) and Jeremy said the snakemen are here to save Eternia. Well SA he-man was extremely hard to find, the case ratios were still bad and soon enough people gave up.
    Just to clarify, I don't think Val was saying they should do that but was informing us based Mattels marketing research. At the time we were getting all this marketing research stuff, which boiled down to the lines doing well we want it to do better so we will make changes.

    Case ratios and a certain set of variants were a big thing in the end of the line. Advertisements for the line were hard to find, the show was only advertised during the block of TV it was on, and a few time shifts. Also overstating things that are true like the sales of bad guys and female figures, which were partially what lead to bad case ratios. Yes, the main hero sales the best followed by the main bad guy, then it gets tiered down and females are a tricky thing that will get short packed because if they are packed normally they peg warm (rare cases they don't) underpack them too much it causes other problems. So technically I would say case ratios aren't what killed the line, it was Mattel trying to change the product through case ratios and design in an attempt to improve sales which is tricky to say the least especially design changes.

    The problem with toy shelves is they are trying to get just enough product without having too much overhead and left over stock. With the 90s video games boom, kids are buying them younger and getting out of toys sooner. Yes there are toy drives and kids still buy figures, that it was leaving more product on the shelves.

    I think if they want to do something do something like the Skylanders/Disney Infinity but instead of mini statues have them have some articulation that way kids can play with them outside of the videogame.
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  25. #375
    Heroic Master of 200X MegaGearMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alexx View Post
    More and more I hear this in the toy isles: "Well he/she has a pile of toys and all they do is sit in front of the tv and play video games" or something of the sort. Why spend that much on a toy when you could get another game for the same amount (depending on where you go and how old it is) and get more use out of it? Now, of course, I have no solid data and I'm only going on the same info that you're getting: people passing by. I can't say that's evidence.
    That's why I think He-Man needs to make a jump over to console video games like Transformers did and become a multimedia character.

    I guess, to answer your main question: It would take A LOT to convince Mattel's upper management. You have to change minds that are convinced that the data they are getting from the current online market is true for more than just the online market. They won't want to take the risk of a high-run toyline out in retail. Just look at how they deal with 200X! "NO 200X STYLE!" Why? What are they afraid of? It was a failed toyline! So they don't want any of that "poison", and if this current toyline is on the decline, then they won't want to take the chance.

    Don't get me wrong...if they tried and it WORKED, then i'd slap my own face and shake your hand. I just have no idea what it would take to convince Mattel to take the chance.
    I think what might work is a re-imagining of iconic MOTU. Not like the New 52 reboot or 200X, but something else. I hate the new CGI Nick TMNT (it's TOO silly for my tastes), but it's blend of action and comedy might be the direction that Mattel should go in. Use something like Slichochin's stylized MOTU designs for a combination of nostalgia and child appeal and pick a station that won't screw them over.

    The Blonde Teela (Battleground and Alcala Teela) Thread
    The Cloak and Dagger Evil-Lyn (The Real 200X Evil-Lyn) Thread
    MegaGearMax's 200X/MYP Screen Grabs

    Oo-Larr • Sagitar • Cloak and Dagger Evil-Lyn • 200X Prince Adam • 200X Sorceress • Ninjor • Tung Lashor • Sssqueeze • Angella • Perfuma • Mermista • Evilseed (MYP)

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