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Thread: Will the real Prince Adam please stand up?

  1. #1
    Heroic Warrior vid.tracey's Avatar
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    Will the real Prince Adam please stand up?

    Hi y'all, i know you are all busy looking at all the new reveals plus this may have been covered on another thread but wouldn't mind hearing your thoughts on what you think Prince Adams real personality really is?

    After watching the end of Kill Bill vol.2( Bills speech about Superman/Clark Kent), it makes me think where Prince Adam ends and He-man begins?

    FILMATION

    Prince Adam- Carefree, relaxed, jovial
    He-man- Moral, wise, leader

    MYP SERIES

    Prince Adam- Spoilt, brash
    He-man- Soldier, uncertain

    Does Adam use his personality as a disguise or is he really that way in nature? Is the most powerful-est man in the universe really a coward at heart? In the MYP series He-man still acts with the teenage Adams uncertainty whereas in the filmation series, the two are almost completely different! When Adam loses the power to change and must depend on himself to save the day, is more of He-mans personality shown?

    In my own personal canon, Adam chooses to be the bumbling joker so people dont mistake him for He-man a la clark kent but i would be interested to know what others think?
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  2. #2
    Heroic Warrior
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    I do think Adam is a little more carefree to an extent, but only becasue he's usually only around when danger isn't present. In my mind Adam/He-Man is all one personality, with the "cowardly & lazy" personality being a facade to throw people off. I mean if you look at him when he went to Etheria where nobody knew him, you didn;t really see any of that even when he wasn't transformed. He even went as far as to fight the Horde Troopers with Bow in the Laughing Swan Inn, and tried to help the rebellion whenever he could.

  3. #3
    2002/DC He-Man Video guy Jukka's Avatar
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    In Filmation-mythos, the Sword only "enchances that which is already in". Meaning that Adam is the real person, and He-Man is an empowered version of him. He-Man can't know something which Adam hasn't learned during his studies or training. But to protect his secret identity, he acts as playful and clumsy Prince, much to his father's dismay. In the episode "Into the Abyss" we get a glimpse of the real Adam, who is also a bit tired of acting out the carefree Prince all the time. Adam is more than capable of taking care of himself and saving his friends, like in "No Job Too Small".

    MYP-mythos, I believe it is still Adam in there. When he has transformed for the first time and punches the meteorite that Evil-Lyn sends at the heroic warriors, Adam is suprised at his own strength, now as He-Man. MYP handled He-Man more as having a big learning curve on things, while Man-At-Arms was the leader of group.

  4. #4
    Do it right or not at all Reboot's Avatar
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    Well, in Filmation it's fairly simple - the only differences beyond the super powers between Adam and He-Man (and indeed, Adora & She-Ra) are cosmetic - and, infamously, even those are slight. When he "acts like a goof", the operative word is "acting".

    (OTOH, Cringer is absolutely *not* Battlecat, and the Spirit/Swiftwind situation is vaguely complicated - he changes in his first transformation in the same sort of way Cringer does... and then he never really changes back. Spirit after that point is analogous to Cringer thinking and talking like Battlecat).

    MYP is more complicated - I look at it like the Jerry Ordway reboot of Captain Marvel (the Power of Shazam! version). He-Man is absolutely Adam... but an "Adam-plus". He's Adam with more courage, knowledge and wisdom - and he doesn't really know how to process this all the time, which is why he comes across as (as Jukka puts it) confused sometimes.

  5. #5
    Widget Wrestler Mr. Shokoti's Avatar
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    I love Tarantino but I thought that bit of dialogue about Superman in Kill Bill 2 was utter crap. I don't think Superman looks down on humans; I feel he thinks of himself as one of them, for the most part, when he isn't fighting super villains.

    I like to think of Prince Adam/He-Man the same way I think of Clark Kent/Superman; both are disguises.

    I feel the "real" Prince Adam/Clark Kent is the one that can relax at home & let their guard down around those who know their secret identities(Man-At-Arms & Lois for instance). I feel the Prince Adam/Clark Kent seen in public is similar with a little of the clumsy coward act thrown in to make sure their identity isn't revealed. I also feel that while some of the real Prince Adam/Clark Kent is at the basis of the He-Man/Superman personality, they also both wear their game faces(and shy away from letting anyone know their emotional vulnerabilities) as a source of inspiration for those around them.
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  6. #6
    Do it right or not at all Reboot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Shokoti View Post
    I love Tarantino but I thought that bit of dialogue about Superman in Kill Bill 2 was utter crap. I don't think Superman looks down on humans; I feel he thinks of himself as one of them, for the most part, when he isn't fighting super villains.
    Oh, it was absolutely true of the Silver Age (60s) Superman, and it's something they tried to eliminate when they rebooted him in the 80s (with mixed success over the years, since some writers are wedded to the Silver Age concepts).

  7. #7
    Heroic Warrior King Tycho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reboot View Post
    Oh, it was absolutely true of the Silver Age (60s) Superman, and it's something they tried to eliminate when they rebooted him in the 80s (with mixed success over the years, since some writers are wedded to the Silver Age concepts).
    Which is a shame. John Byrne's take on Supes was perfect.

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