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Thread: Discuss your feelings about this picture.

  1. #26
    Let's get Crita in MOTUC! The All American's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heeeere's Olesker! View Post
    The thing that I think factors in most -- and this will sound odd coming from someone that's been a TV writer for over thirty years -- is television. Much of children's television makes it so easy for kids not to think and that's the death of creativity.
    I agree. As for me, I always loved Muppet Babies, that was a great show that was all about promoting imagination.

    A lot of kid shows nowadays do seem dumbed down. How do we fix this?


    As for the picture, it's a reflection/sign of the times. I'm so lucky I grew up in the 80's. My older sister was a videogame-aholic, but she and I played with our toys a lot too. Toys were always my favorite, and inspire more thinking than TV or a smartphone ever will. It forces you to create. You create interactions, stories, and relationships in the physical world. Toys may be playthings, but they exist in reality.

  2. #27
    Wise Old Trollan Uncle Montork's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heeeere's Olesker! View Post
    The cost of three action figures and a vehicle purchased for $25 in 1980, when adjusted for inflation comes out to sixty-eight dollars in 2013 dollars -- about the cost of a top video game. So price-wise all things are about equal so when we're talking about action figures back in the 80s vs. video games of today -- price-wise, at least -- it's a level playing field.
    That's exactly what I mean though, Jack. OF COURSE toys were a bigger seller back then. Yeah, a vehicle and 3 figs were $26 in the 1980. Let's move that to, say, $30 in 1985. An NES alone was $100-200, and the $100 ones didn't come with a game! Games were $50-60 a piece! Special controllers were $20-35... for one! Imagine all the toys you'd get in the mid 80s for $60! Now, what can you get in today's toys for $26, or even $60? Not a whole hell of a lot. But Video games are still $50-60 a piece, systems.. well you can still get a basic Nintendo Wii for $100 or a DS for $150ish. Controllers are still around the same price, too.

    What I'm saying is, if toys in the 80s had been as expensive as they are now, but video games were still in the same range they've always been, would have less toys sold vs. video games, as they do now?
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  3. #28
    Melaktha For MotUC!! adol's Avatar
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    If those were Skylanders toys, he'd be paying attention.
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  4. #29
    Supreme Fudge Dynamo of Eternia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Montork View Post
    That's exactly what I mean though, Jack. OF COURSE toys were a bigger seller back then. Yeah, a vehicle and 3 figs were $26 in the 1980. Let's move that to, say, $30 in 1985. An NES alone was $100-200, and the $100 ones didn't come with a game! Games were $50-60 a piece! Special controllers were $20-35... for one! Imagine all the toys you'd get in the mid 80s for $60! Now, what can you get in today's toys for $26, or even $60? Not a whole hell of a lot. But Video games are still $50-60 a piece, systems.. well you can still get a basic Nintendo Wii for $100 or a DS for $150ish. Controllers are still around the same price, too.

    What I'm saying is, if toys in the 80s had been as expensive as they are now, but video games were still in the same range they've always been, would have less toys sold vs. video games, as they do now?
    I agree with this. Heck, back in the cartridge gaming days, games sometimes cost more than they do today for two key reasons...
    1. Cartridges cost more to make than pressed discs.
    2. Prices of games weren't as standardized as they are today. These days short of finding a good temporary sale or deal, a brand bew game that just came out is $60 everywhere. And when it officially drops in price, that happens roughly everywhere as well (some retailers may take a bit longer than others to adjust it though).

    Back in the NES and SNES days, one store might charge more than another. I remember when I was 14, I paid $80, which I had saved up for a while, for Mortal Kombat II for SNES which I had reserved at Babbages. That's $20 more than the cost of a game today, and if you adjust for inflation, it was even more expensive.


    I was at a Target store in the video game section not too long ago, and there was a woman there looking at the little figurines that go with the Skylanders video game. she was saying that she was getting them for her kids. I was saying that I'm a gamer, but have not gotten into that particular game because of the cost of collecting the figures. She understood my point, but then commented on how they are stilll cheaper on average than buying many of the toys in the acton figutr isle for her kids, and I couldn't argue with that! And that's probably about the most expensive game to play right now with collecting those figures.


    The other issue is how much gaming and elecronics have taken over in the years since we were kids. Sure, I had an NES when I was 6 years old and still had tons of interest un toys (in fact I only begrudgingly stopped playing with and collecting toys when I got to be 'too old' to do so.... but on some level my interest never really went away). But back then all we had were the likes of the NES and maybe the Gameboy for anyone who got one right when it came out (I was in my tens before I got one). These days with iPads, iPhones, iPod touches, etc., kids can do a heck of a lot more 'on the go' than we could back then. And console gaming has evolved beyond what we had back then, too.

    And going back to my point about discs being cheaper to make then cartridges, these days game prices drop much faster and more frequently than they did back then because the cost of making a new copy of an older game back then was more than it is today. So people who wait a little bit can get a whole game for $20 - $40. In the toy isle, that may buy them 2 - 4 of those 4 inch Marvel figures that have almost no articulation. So that's a big part of the issue.


    As for this photo and the concept it conveys, yeah it does make me sad to an extent, but largely because I remember the fun that I had with my toys as a kid. But I think it's largely generational. The kinds of toys that we grew up with were a relatively new concept at the that started mainly in the late 70s with the Star Wars figures. My mom never stopped me or forbid me from having them and got them for me as giftd, etc, but she never understood the appeal. I enjoyed things like MOTU Thundercats, Ghostbusters, and TMNT, which she would often collectively refer to as "ugly monster things." She would odten try to push me more in the direction of Hot Wheels cars, GI Joe, etc, which I had some of, but they never heald the same interest for me. And I think she felt that these were less imaginative than going outside and making up my own games or whatever. So it's all relative.

    I think the toy industry is in major trouble if they can't find new, more cost efficient materials and processes to make things like action figures. That is the main thing that needs to change in order for them to remain relevant.
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  5. #30
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    Excellent points, Uncle...as usual.

    It's a difficult hypothetical to answer -- kind of like who would win in a boxing match between Tyson and Ali.

    This is one time where I'm going to zip it because I'd like others to weigh in on your interesting question first.

    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Montork View Post
    That's exactly what I mean though, Jack. OF COURSE toys were a bigger seller back then. Yeah, a vehicle and 3 figs were $26 in the 1980. Let's move that to, say, $30 in 1985. An NES alone was $100-200, and the $100 ones didn't come with a game! Games were $50-60 a piece! Special controllers were $20-35... for one! Imagine all the toys you'd get in the mid 80s for $60! Now, what can you get in today's toys for $26, or even $60? Not a whole hell of a lot. But Video games are still $50-60 a piece, systems.. well you can still get a basic Nintendo Wii for $100 or a DS for $150ish. Controllers are still around the same price, too.

    What I'm saying is, if toys in the 80s had been as expensive as they are now, but video games were still in the same range they've always been, would have less toys sold vs. video games, as they do now?

  6. #31
    Shivering Isles resident diosoth's Avatar
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    First person I blame is the toy companies. They keep raising prices to levels that put off buyers. Toys cost a lot more than ever, whereas game consoles do not-factoring inflation, modern system launch prices are far less than they used to be and games have seen little markup after the switch to disc formats. Prior to discs, game carts could get very costly depending on the chips inside. For the cost, a handheld gaming device that costs the price of only 5 action figures probably offers more enjoyment and use.

    Second, I blame stores. They've gained more authority to dictate what is made, yet even when they get their way they still often show little support to the stuff the demanded. If a single figure from a line piles up, the store will deem the entire line a failure instead of admitting the problem was one specific toy.

    Third, I blame adult collectors. I'm not flaming all adult toy buyers, but the snooty ones insisted and demanded more articulation and detail. That means more parts, more paints, more R&D, more molds and more cost to make a toy all to try and please adult buyers, when kids don't care either way. Adult collectors seem to want to be catered to and have forgotten the primary market for toys are children. A lot of us seem malcontent with toys that are "for kids". Again, not attacking all adults who buy toys, but there's a degree of arrogance around.

    Fourth, I blame the companies again for bending over backwards for adult collectors, even though many of them admit we're a small market share for them. I think in the efforts to make toys appeal to adults, they've made them less appealing for children. Not to say we should be ignored, but we should not be their only source of feedback.

  7. #32
    master of hiphop
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    Personally i thing video games have slowly taken over through the times.. but i remember playing outside, hockey and basketball.. just being active.. and when i played with action figures as a kid my imagination would run crazy!!! now it's video games that plot out everything including and i'm sorry to say this as i'm sure i will get spit on for saying this Lazy... Excessive gaming IMO makes people lazy, it's ok to play a bit but it really sometimes gets out of hand i think.

    and my last point is i really think they don't make anything these days that draws in kids like they did in the 80's
    transformers
    He-man
    thundercats and so on....

    these ideas are only regenerated over the years.. where are those great ideas anymore.. i mean a toy that you could transform from a car to a robot... come on.... i don't care what you say.. kids don't have those cool ideas coming down the pipe.. i some times go down to the toy department at local stores to see what they have.. and it's always empty.. no ones is there.. but back in the 80's man.. when you had he-man on pegs and transformers, gi-joe... those departments were always filled...

    anyways just my 2 cents.
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  8. #33
    Heroic Warrior wyldman11's Avatar
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    Would it be different if he was reading a book, reading a comic book, oddly until a few years ago toy collecting and video games were considered geeky.
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  9. #34
    master of hiphop
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    good point.. but i do still think that toy collecting and gaming is still considered geeky ,, it's just that geeky now is what's trending.. people can say what they want.. but everyone has a bit of geek in em it's just how much you let it expose itself to the public

    Quote Originally Posted by wyldman11 View Post
    Would it be different if he was reading a book, reading a comic book, oddly until a few years ago toy collecting and video games were considered geeky.
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  10. #35
    Shivering Isles resident diosoth's Avatar
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    Transformers isn't the same as it was. A lot of stuff from the 80s is now outdated which is why a lot of the revivals bombed(there just isn't a market for Thundercats, it seems). GI Joe is now washed out, the older fans are dwindling and it's getting no new fans partly as what it represented is no longer relevant and I think the fantasy sci-fi elements coupled with the goofiness lost their appeal. Joe fans have also changed for the worse, overall, they've become much more rude and arrogant than Joe collectors used to be. They're an elitist bunch, I think partially as the good ones got tired of the brand already. The ones who hang on want to justify it and pretend the brand is still going strong when it's barely alive.

    But toy companies aren't focusing too hard on new IP- Monster High was a big risk that paid off but we don't see much of that. Most new toys are tie-ins to movies and cartoons.

  11. #36
    Vintage Vintage Vintage Vlcan's Avatar
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    His mom & dad won't buy him any of the MOTUC figures. I wouldn't want to play with those crappy figures either. Straight MOTU all the way.

  12. #37
    Heroic Warrior wyldman11's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by diosoth View Post
    Transformers isn't the same as it was. A lot of stuff from the 80s is now outdated which is why a lot of the revivals bombed(there just isn't a market for Thundercats, it seems). GI Joe is now washed out, the older fans are dwindling and it's getting no new fans partly as what it represented is no longer relevant and I think the fantasy sci-fi elements coupled with the goofiness lost their appeal. Joe fans have also changed for the worse, overall, they've become much more rude and arrogant than Joe collectors used to be. They're an elitist bunch, I think partially as the good ones got tired of the brand already. The ones who hang on want to justify it and pretend the brand is still going strong when it's barely alive.

    But toy companies aren't focusing too hard on new IP- Monster High was a big risk that paid off but we don't see much of that. Most new toys are tie-ins to movies and cartoons.
    Thundercat toys did OK at first, then had several problems. One of which was it wasn't sure if it wanted to target adult collectors or children which have different needs and wants out of action figures. The cartoon was doing well enough ratings wise, but the tie in product ended up bombing. I have a feeling if they had done something more like Skylanders it would have gone over better.

    I do agree on the statement video games are still, at least to some extent considered geeky, the problem really is certain games are more considered cool FPS being the big one. That basically replaces kids playing war outside so.

    I do see where the photo is coming from in the scheme of telling a story, but as others pointed out did the kid leave the toys or just taking a break from them. I collected toys, played various sports across the street, played video games, read books and I am sure other passtimes, does it mean I hated my toys when I wasn't playing with them?
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