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We flash back to an earlier release with this photo review by Beeternia and Electrified Porcupine. click here to check out his review of MOTUC Battle Armor He-Man.
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

We here at Power-Con understand the frustration over the immense cost of international shipping. And while courier and fulfillment costs are beyond our control, we still try to do what we can to help international fans save money when possible. So this year's show sees the addition of two trusted Germany reseller outlets where German fans can pre-order and potentially save money.

Both Grayskull Con and Planet Eternia will serve as the two reseller outlets for German fans to contact for pre-orders. German fans are more than welcome to still order directly from Power-Con. But if it will help you save money, we encourage you to consider reaching out to one of these two outlets. This arrangement may also help fans in the European Union save on shipping as well, but fans in the European Union will want to contact these German outlets for more info.

To give an example of possible estimated savings for German fans, when you order a single 3-pack from Power-Con you might pay a total of 240,80 Euro after customs fees. And if you order two 3-packs, you might pay a total of 178,50 Euro per 3-pack after customs fees. But if you order from either German outlet, each 3-pack will cost you 153,00 Euro plus shipping within Germany.

Pre-sales at both German outlets will start the same date as Power-Con pre-orders: Saturday, April 8th.

Please note that all orders placed through these German outlets will not come with a Power-Con 2017 Non-Attendee badge or Power-Con 2017 program guide. Also, any issues over insurance, condition of the 3-packs, problems with figures, and so forth, have to be handled directly with these German outlets, and are subject to their own Terms and Conditions. Power-Con has no involvement with nor any responsibility for any order you choose to place through these outlets. Both German outlets will have an equal allocation of 3-packs. So when one runs out of stock, any interested fan must pre-order from the other outlet. There is also no guarantee they can fulfill all pre-order inquiries. Once both vendors have reached a limit with which they feel comfortable, all additional pre-orders must be placed directly through Power-Con.

For interested German fans (and possibly other European Union fans), please keep an eye out for an announcement with more details on the websites of these German outlets, which should be posted very soon.

And, please remember that pre-orders at both Power-Con and these German outlets start on Saturday, April 8th.

Thank you to everyone for your support of Power-Con! We hope that one day, all of you might make it to our show. And thank you to Grayskull Con and Planet Eternia for helping out fellow fans in Germany.

SDCC She-Ra doll video review by John Hale March 28, 2017 11:52 pm by JVS3

Flashing back to an earlier release, John Hale takes a look at the SDCC She-Ra doll!
And click here to join the discussion about John's reviews on the He-Man.Org forums.

Power-Con 2017 Tickets and Exclusives On Sale April 8 March 28, 2017 1:26 pm by TheShadow

Attendee, non-attendee, and exhibitor registration for Power-Con 2017 will open on Saturday, April 8th at 9:00 AM Pacific / 12:00 noon Eastern on the Power-Con website.

  • Saturday, September 9th Only: $25
  • Sunday, September 10th Only: $25
  • Weekend, Both Sep 9th & 10th: $40
  • POWER PASS* Weekend, Both Sep 9th & 10th: $150

The Power-Con Masters of the Universe Classics exclusive 3-packs will be available at $105 US each for Attendees and Exhibitors. Attendees and exhibitors must be present at the convention to pick up their exclusives; they will not be shipped.

Non-attendees who cannot attend, but still want the exclusives, must purchase a one-time-per-order Merchandise Access Pass of $25 in addition to the cost of the 3-packs and will be responsible for additional shipping and handling fees.

Non-attendees from Germany will have two German outlets that may be able to save German fans more money off the total cost. German fans, please check back later for more details.

Two more exclusives and Power-Con souvenir shirts will be revealed before pre-orders begin so please keep watching for more announcements! These additional exclusives and t-shirts will be available to attendees and exhibitors ONLY; they cannot be shipped.

*Power Pass is extremely limited and includes: attendee with general weekend access to the show, guaranteed front row seating in all panels during regular show hours, access to the Green Room with beverage and snacks during show hours plus lunch, one free convention t-shirt, and entrance to the show 30 minutes prior to regular show hours.

Jack P. Starro (Skell-Skells on the He-Man.Org forums) has reviewed How He-Man Mastered the Universe, a new MOTU book written by Brian C. Baer. Check out his review below,
click here to order your copy from Amazon!
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums. 

How He-Man Mastered the Universe: Toy to Television to the Big Screen is quite obviously a labour of love by author Brian C. Baer, rich with behind-the-scenes detail about the length and breadth of the Masters of the Universe. Evidently committed to championing a positive, yet not blindly fannish view of the highs and lows of He-Man's epic journey as a franchise, it casts a critical eye towards the strengths and weaknesses of the brand over its many incarnations and relaunches, assessing its triumphs and missteps alike.

Staring with a heartwarming tale about being introduced to He-Man almost literally at birth by his enthusiastic older brother, it is a book with a lot to recommend. Baer is a good writer, having an easy style of prose that is at once conversational, narrative, and analytical, making for a reading experience that is entertaining, thought-provoking, and potentially quite informative, depending on how deeply versed the reader may be with some of the minutiae of the franchise. Unlike many of the recent and forthcoming sumptuously illustrated tomes published by Dark Horse, however, this is not the book to seek if you are looking for an encyclopedic breakdown of the characters and worlds portrayed in MOTU, a cavalcade of rare art or comic book reproductions, nor detailed canonical analysis of various different intersecting continuity phases.

While those Dark Horse volumes were produced in collaboration with Mattel, the book we have here is an example of what might be called "popular academia", somewhere between those titles like Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy, or especially akin to Superman vs. Hollywood, which Baer actually cites once or twice. At 200-odd pages, this book has around a dozen black and white images scattered throughout, mostly design sketches from the 1987 movie and photographs of the vintage toys, presumably to avoid issues with fair use copyright over using any published comic book art or stills from the cartoons. In short, it is not aiming for casual readers or trying to compete with the lush coffee-table books replete with vintage official artwork, but instead targets those interested in a lightly-academic look at the changing tides of the Masters brand.

That being the case, this is a piece of work I was delighted to be asked to review. As a lifelong He-Man fan myself, and having just recently done my doctoral thesis on adaptation in multimedia franchises (in my case, focusing on Superman), Baer's book was up my alley to a ridiculous extent. In fact, it seemed almost tailor made to my particular obsessions, both as a fan and an academic. I personally found it a deeply engrossing read, and actually took me longer to get through than I'd have expected, as I was so fascinated to really pay attention to the many details he hit upon, constantly checking his pages of endnote citations in the appendices, to examine his sources and follow up on various pieces of information proffered.

That said, I hasten to add that this is not a heavy read. Anyone wanting to ignore his sourcing and bibliography and just take in the book as a relatively narrative account of the history of the Masters Universe should find this goes by at a fairly good clip, and never becomes bogged down in anything other than the very briefest passing explanations of applicable academic theories such as Campbell's "Hero's Journey" monomyth or just a couple of film and media studies terms by Lemke or Epstein. Predominantly, it is an entertaining and affectionate analysis of the Masters of the Universe brand in its various incarnations.

However, this lightly academic approach is both the book's strength and its weakness.

How He-Man Mastered the Universe is a book I liked a lot. In fact it is one I wanted to love, but unfortunately I am held back from giving it an overwhelmingly glowing review because of some notable shortcomings. These can be split between one broad, arguably subjective issue, and then several more specific problems.

To address the elephant in the room first, this book is not exactly what it purports to be. Although my digital review copy did not include scans of the final published back cover, nevertheless the title, preface and introduction present the book as being ostensibly how I have already described it -- an analytical overview of the whole history of MOTU across its different incarnations and media adaptations. To be fair, the book does cover all of this, and it is no mere lip-service, but what it is ultimately very clearly about is much more specific: the 1987 live-action movie.

Much to my surprise, this volume is predominantly a detailed description of the inception, creation, release and aftermath of the somewhat notorious film starring Dolph Lundgren as He-Man and Frank Langella as Skeletor, directed by Gary Goddard. As in, five of the nine chapters (and well over half of its pagecount) are almost entirely about the movie and its broader context in the story of Cannon Films and the infamous movie hucksters Golan and Globus.

You could say that this is much more a book about Hollywood than toy makers, although to be fair, it does frequently return to the issue of what Mattel sought to gain from the expected promotional power of having a motion picture based on its toy brand. There is analysis examining how the film's embattled production and bombing at the box office ended up being somewhat of a one-two punch that brought the independently dwindling vintage toyline to its knees, or at any rate did nothing to keep Masters off the ropes when it was already struggling.

Essentially, it is a question of emphasis and purpose. If you embrace the movie or are at any rate intrigued by behind-the-scenes information, close analysis of the film itself, and a focus on its place in the franchise, then all well and good. However, if you are from that segment of the fandom that hold little more than distain for the film, or are likely to be irked by an overview of the entire Masters franchise that focuses so intently on what is objectively one of its least successful (be that financially, critically, or in terms of fan consensus) and shortest-lived incarnations… then this probably isn't the book for you.

Whether one can claim that the book is misrepresenting itself is probably a matter of opinion, as it certainly does cover virtually the entire history of the brand, and not simply in passing, or as window-dressing. A whole meaty chapter apiece is spent on the early development of the brand and Filmation's indelible contributions to the mythos, and they are both great reads. However, when you realise that pages and pages are expended on Frank Langella's portrayal of Skeletor while the original iconic voice actor Alan Oppenheimer is only twice referenced, quite fleetingly, and neither time during the Filmation chapter, the question of emphasis is hard to ignore.

True to the book's quasi-academic roots, in reexamining the film on the cusp of its thirtieth anniversary, Baer is ultimately putting forward his central thesis. To really boil it down, he argues that, despite being a compromised film and a box-office flop, the 1987 movie is not only an underappreciated cult movie gem, but moreover doesn't get the credit it deserves in spearheading modern transmedia movie franchises. As the first major live-action film adapted from a toy-based property, Baer sees the Masters film as an under-acknowledged forerunner for not only the Michael Bay Transformers films, but even the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

This is where I feel Baer's argument gets a bit ropey. To give him his due, he provides a lot of very solid context regarding earlier trendsetters of multimedia-disseminated intellectual property with the Superman and Star Wars franchises, and does a compelling job of supporting the contention that Mattel was the pioneer of creating a diverse and successful range of both ancillary merchandise and entertainment products across multiple media to support an original toyline concept. He even makes the compelling argument that using entertainment synergy via a toy-based cartoon was a winning formula very much copied by competitors like Hasbro's Transfomers and G.I. Joe, and later the comic-derived Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Where Baer does not convince, however, is in drawing a line between the failure of the Masters movie and the later success of Michael Bay's adaptation of the Transformers property into box office gold, let alone wider implications about current media trends.

While Baer is technically quite correct in stressing that Gary Goddard's 1987 film Masters of the Universe receives very little recognition for being the first film based on a toy franchise, I remain unconvinced by the line of argument that suggests that toy tie-in movies are in any way now the norm. Apart from Michael Bay's Transformers series, are there any other truly successful examples? While Goddard may have done it first, the two decade gap which elapsed before Bay later made toy-based films a viable prospect renders it unconvincing that there is any compelling connection between the two events, and nor does Baer provide much evidence to support the notion.

Moreover I seriously question the assertion that Masters, by the transitive property of Bay's success with Transformers, is in any way responsible for Marvel Studios' cross-media strategy with the MCU. Although this might be set to change in the future, thus far the Transformer movies, critically lambasted and financially successful though they may be, are just a series of linear sequels supported by ancillary products and canonically separate parallel entertainment, in way not significantly different to the DC comics films of the 1980s and ‘90s, or even the radio and television incarnations of Superman in the 1940s and ‘50s.

What was revolutionary about the MCU was its shared universe model, embracing true transmedia storytelling between films and multiple television formats, telling stories which are always not direct sequels to one another, yet share a unified continuity. This is not something that they took from Bay's Transformers, and it is certainly not something inspired by Goddard's Masters of the Universe. Now that other film studios are falling over themselves to emulate Marvel's successful model, it is highly spurious to suggest that toy-based filmmaking is in any way standard fare even today, let alone to assert that the current entertainment landscape "couldn't have happened without He-Man."

Aside from these larger considerations of whether Baer's underpinning argument is inherently flawed or whether his choice of emphasis or representation of that overwhelming focus is problematic, the book also has some other issues. Mostly these come down to what I can only suspect is a lack of qualified editorial oversight and fact-checking. Although mostly devoid of the kind of howlers that can crop up in some works of popular academia, there are a few mistakes that may jump out at you, from simple things like misspelling Jimmy Olsen as "Olson", odd little canonical semantics like referring to the Horde as "an evil alien race" or describing the phenomenon of short-packing as an "error" rather than merely toy industry practice. Personally the biggest eyebrow-raiser was the description at one point of the iconic ramskull-topped Havoc Staff as Skeletor's "tall snakehead staff". Baer clearly knows his MOTU lore, so I will give him the benefit of the doubt that this was just a rather bizarre "brain-fart" that wasn't caught by editors who didn't know any better, if indeed he had any.

In fact, a lack of editorial oversight could explain some of the books other technical flaws. Structurally, even aside from the question of over-emphasis on the movie, it has some strange choices, such as anachronistically discussing the finished film at length between the chapters on pre- and post-production. Baer also has some overly digressive sections where he gives blow-by-blows of the narratives of three vintage minicomics and six Filmation episodes, as well as a detailed summary of the three-episode pilot to the 2002 Mike Young Productions cartoon. Although quite entertaining to read and not without some analytical observations on the material, these feel somewhat like padding, perhaps to justify Baer's claim to focus on the franchise as a whole rather than the movie alone. Moreover, they feel faintly redundant, given the existence of Dark Horse's recently-published minicomic collection and exhaustive book on the Filmation series by James Eatock.

In all fairness, Baer could be seen as being in a bit of a catch-22 situation here, as discussing the cartoons and minicomics too much he would be overlapping excessively with other material that is out there, while doing too little would make his movie-centric appraisal of the franchise seem all the more unbalanced. However, in focusing so much on the '87 film he is at least achieving a form of market-differentiation from the official books on other topics from Dark Horse. What perhaps would have been a good idea to enhance the book's broad-ranging aspirations might have come in the form of more analysis of the less well-known media expressions of the franchise, such as Ladybird books, UK comics or German audioplays. The reach and diversity of MOTU's international appeal and the localised content generated for these markets would have been a good topic to properly delve into.

To an extent, my critique of the book in this regard leads to what I feel is probably its major shortcoming, which is the quality of its scholarship. As a piece of mass-market popular academia, this book does a good job of tying together various sources of information into a coherent and engaging narrative of events in telling the story of the franchise. However, it does not do so in a way which truly brings very much new to the table from a research standpoint.

With the exception of four personally-conducted interviews with '87 movie director Gary Goddard, designer William Stout, Toy Masters documentarian Corey Landis, and recent minicomic writer Tim Seeley (most of which just corroborates things already on the record), Baer isn't ultimately revealing much new content here, strictly speaking. This should not be taken as a damning indictment -- there is certainly a place for books which summarise a wealth of disparate information from many different sources and coalesce it into a digestible narrative. I merely mean to say that from an academic perspective, given his central argument is somewhat flimsy, Baer does not provide any great revelations or dish up any exciting new dirt in terms of investigative scholarship. If you want to watch documentaries like Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films, read Roger Sweet's infamous tell-all book and peruse a lot of online interviews and archives (or, as a hardcore fan, you quite possibly already have), then this book isn't likely to teach you anything new, so much as conveniently give a lot of it to you all in one sitting.

There is one problem, though, which I must point out. In his seventh chapter, after discussing some of the fallout from the movie and its abandoned sequel, Baer spends some time outlining the collapse of the vintage toyline and the short-lived rebranding as simply He-Man, aka New Adventures. In relating the development of this relaunch, Baer covers not only the Jetlag New Adventures of He-Man cartoon which actually was produced, but also two pitches for proposed cartoons about He-Ro, the son of He-Man, which never came to fruition.

As I mentioned earlier, Baer uses a fair bit of academic citation in the book, unobtrusively tucked away as endnotes in the appendices for those interested enough to actually check his sources, without wanting to bore the casual reader. At times his sources aren't the best, and most of his account of the early days of the franchise come only from Roger Sweet's often factually dubious book, but to cut him some slack there admittedly aren't many verifiable resources out there for a lot of this material.

However, when it comes to the discussion of the actual and aborted relaunches of He-Man in the late 1980s-through-‘90s, Baer simply stops citing sources. For six pages he writes in great detail about New Adventures and the two separate "He-Ro" pitches, before rather weakly explaining in an endnote that "most of the information in this section" comes from the Lou Scheimer's series bible for the 1996 proposal, as reproduced in full at He-Man.Org. This is all perfectly acceptable for the information related to that pitch specifically, but this material does not in any way corroborate his descriptions of New Adventures nor, more crucially, the earlier and far more obscure 1988 pitch for a "He-Ro" series.

The reason for this seems relatively obvious upon reflection: Unlike the 1996 version, the series bible for the proposed 1988 cartoon has never been made publicly available, and the main source of information on it comes only from a detailed description, written from memory alone after a single reading, as posted in a forum thread on He-Man.Org by prominent member Penny Dreadful.

Even if there is no reasonable basis to doubt the information's authenticity, it would be understandable if Baer felt squirrelly about using as his only cited source a forum post which is technically hearsay, at least by academic standards, in the absence of any available scans of the pitch bible itself. However, to present the information completely without sourcing looks worse, especially since Baer appears to be disingenuously implying that any such preceding information call all be gleaned from the '96 pitch – his only adjacent citation – or at any rate allows readers to interpret it this way.

This is misrepresentation at worst and sloppy scholarship at best, and sticks out like a sore thumb in an otherwise fairly competently sourced piece of writing. I don't wish to assert that Baer is disseminating inaccurate information per se, so unless you're a conspiracy theorist regarding the '88 pitch and/or don't care much about academic citation practices anyway, I'd be fairly confident in saying that Baer's account is correct. But it is nevertheless a blunder that is not up to snuff from a scholarly standpoint.

For the most part though, this is a solid book, and one that is both well-written and very enjoyable to read for both Masters fans and those interested in a very thorough distillation of the fairly extraordinary story behind the making of a notorious cult movie. Although the underlying scholarship and overarching argument the book puts forward have their shortcomings, the book also has some academic value as an examination of transmedia trends, and is probably the first study of its kind to throw a serious light on Masters of the Universe as a trendsetting franchise. I can recommend the book, as long as you're aware of the its heavy focus on the 1987 film, and don't mind that the other sections deal with the broader franchise in far less exacting detail.
- Book Review by Jack P. Starro

NOTE:  The author of this article contributed in their individual capacity. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of He-Man.Org, MVCreations, or any other party.

He-Man.Org user Lich Leech walks through the designs and changes of artwork on the brand! This is part 2 of 6 of his look at the vintage MOTU boxart.

click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums.

For fans of the 3.75" ReActon MOTU line from Super7, be sure to get their Temple of Darkness Sorceress which is available right now!
Click here to order.
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

Tappers of Grayskull Week 2 tournament is going on right now!

Each tournament will last a week, and you can earn DOUBLE the amount of medals!
• For the second week of March 25-31, level up all your Masters as many times as possible and the players with the highest total of Master levels will be the tournament winners!
• Finally, for the third week of April 1-7, strike as many weak points as you can to win this round's tournaments.

Click here to download Tappers of Grayskull today!
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums.

Axel Gimenez MOTUC sketches and designs: Beast Lord March 26, 2017 11:23 pm by JVS3

Axel Gimenez is sharing his MOTUC designs and sketches with fans. Today is the initial design for Beast Lord. Click here to see and learn more about the design directly from Axel on the He-Man.Org forums!

HELP locate He-Man/She-Ra art... March 26, 2017 6:02 pm by Busta Toons

Back in September of last year James Eatock exhibited some of his He-Man and She-Ra animation art at Orbital Comics in London. Whilst the exhibition and animation art sales were a success, there was a slight mishap. Three pieces of artwork from James' personal collection were accidentally sold on the day the exhibition came down. CCTV footage shows that the pieces were mistakenly sold at around midday on Thursday 29th September.

Please take a look at the attached photo. If you happen to have purchased these three pieces, or know the individual that purchased them, PLEASE get in touch with Orbital Comics at info@orbitalcomics.com. These pieces of artwork mean a great deal to James.

MOTUC Horde Trooper Filmation upgrade by Zodac666 March 24, 2017 11:46 pm by JVS3

MOTU Classics Horde Trooper gets a Filmation head sculpt upgrade thanks to this custom by Zodac666 and Eternal Customs. Click here to see more of his work on the He-Man.Org forums!

Tytus bio by gbagok March 24, 2017 10:23 pm by JVS3

gbagok has been creating his own MOTUC bios for years. Here is his bio and artwork for Tytus! Click here to see more of his fan bio cards.

Rene Chavez (bskcase on the He-Man.Org forums) has reviewed How He-Man Mastered the Universe, a new MOTU book written by Brian C. Baer. Check out his review below,
click here to order your copy from Amazon!
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums. 

Brian C. Baer focused his attention on the history of one of our childhood icons and cultural phenomenon in his book How He-Man Mastered the Universe. His book attempts to bring the entire story of the rise and transcendence of the Masters of the Universe franchise in their several forms from toys, TV, and film. As a lifelong fan of He-Man and She-Ra, I began reading this book with several questions and concerns. The casual reader might pick up this book and not question much of the material presented, but there is no casual fan here. I wanted to know if Mr. Baer was going to bring any new insights and information that the fans would love to read about. Was this book going to be the definitive history of Masters of the Universe? The author had to know he was going to face a hardcore group of dedicated fans and one is going to give you a straight review of his book.
I give the author praise for starting his book preface with the title of Man-E-Prefaces; he gets a thumb's up for including one of the toy line's favorite characters. Baer explains where his love of Masters of the Universe originated. His story is pretty similar to our stories. In the first few pages of his book, I quickly realize that Baer is one of us: "He-Fans and She-Ravers" as a certain podcast likes to call us. The preface then goes on to give us some examples of what he is going to be covering and pointing out the influences that eventually led to the creation of a cultural icon and how we now live in a current climate of fandom.
In his introduction, Baer has a great line, "A toy isn't enough anymore." One of the best and most concise sentences explaining the current state of fandom. He alludes to how franchises build financial empires like Harry Potter and Fifty Shades of Grey(?). It's not just about a single product, but attached media, clothing, collectibles, and fan base dedication. His introduction is really an explanation of how cultural icons and fan bases form, but I found it really lacking when he doesn't acknowledge the impact Star Wars made on fandom. He does bring up Star Wars in sporadic passages throughout the book, but he fails to truly give the epic the proper credit. I am a little surprised how he glossed over the subject and yet, he brought up Fifty Shades of Grey again.
In his first chapter, he focuses on the creation of Masters of the Universe. The secret origin of the toy line is a fascinating tale onto itself that has already been the focus of a few other books and documentaries that have yet to be widely released. The author does give a good basic coverage of the long battle between Roger Sweet and Mark Taylor on who created He-Man and the Masters of the Universe. If you are not familiar with this epic battle, the book does give an understanding on the very confusing controversy. The creation of the toy line itself has been covered by other books and some more recent from Dark Horse Publishing. He does conclude with the interesting side note of the lawsuit between Mattel and the Conan Properties, Inc (CPI) which has a note-worthy footnote in history of the toy line. I found it completely humorous that the author failed to include the famous mystery of Wun-Dar – The brown-haired He-Man figure. The judgement and lawsuit may be the reason for Mattel's denial of the figure's existence.
In the middle of the first chapter, he goes on with information on the minicomics and the authors works. In itself, this is vital information in the history of Masters of the Universe. Baer unnecessarily indulges himself by describing his favorite minicomics at length. The history and events that surrounded the minicomics and toys would have sufficed.
Baer jumps to the second chapter with the history of Filmation and the much beloved Lou Scheimer and Hal Sutherland. The history of Filmation needed to be explained, but Baer doesn't bring any new information. Again, Filmation has been the subject of a few books, including a few recent ones. Baer then makes some factual errors during his passage on Filmation.
A glaring one is when he cites that the Star Trek franchise only received one Emmy from one of their Filmation episodes. Star Trek: The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, and Star Trek: Enterprise have all won numerous Emmy awards and received several nominations. The author seems to get distracted in telling anecdotes before he gets back into the subject of his own book.
The second chapter eventually goes on to the creation of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe animated series. Baer jumps in and does include insight and interesting information that every fan of the Filmation series should know. The author does fine work in explaining the struggle Filmation had with producing an inherently violent universe and made it palpable to young viewers with moral lessons and well-written stories (for the most part).
The third and next few chapters leads to the creation of the Masters of the Universe movie and the leading fallout from its financial failure. This is where Baer begins to really shine in his book. The subject of the film has been mired in tales of disappointment, lies, and failure. The author sorts out the stories with information from the actors, crew, and director. He does wander away from the subject material when he begins on the subject of the infamous producers and the business practices of Cannon Films. Their history does need to be covered, but Baer seems to divulge himself again.
Baer really hits his stride when he writes about the pre-production work and onset filming. He provides the details and information that every fan should know. He provides the reader with a lot of interesting stories on the how the film was made among the adversity of a crumbling studio.
The author spends the next few chapters of his book onto the matter of the Masters of the Universe movie. I don't know if he needs to retell the entire movie like how he did in chapter five, but he does give some thoughtful analysis of certain scenes and character portrayals.
What the reader will find interesting is what was not put on film. The author provided a lot of great information from the director and others involved about what they originally intended and some interesting plot points that were changed. Baer also acknowledges that the film could have been something else if things were different. He spends the next few chapters on the fallout of the film and decline of the toy line. He continues with the great details and insider information until he jumps to the next stage of He-Man's history.
Baer begins to falter in his descriptions of the later chapters. He does go into the next stage with The New Adventures of He-Man. He gives a good explanation on why Mattel decided to go a different direction. The reader can tell the author wasn't that interested in the animated series because he didn't indulge in specific episodes. There were a few episodes worth remarking, emphasis on few. The author only goes into the making of the series and some of the style changes. Baer then goes into proposed ideas that never happened. Readers will be fascinated by what directions Masters of the Universe could have gone, but didn't. The author appeared to be running out of steam at this point, but so did the toy line.
Baer moves on about how Masters of the Universe and generally all the 1980s pop culture moved into its own form of rejuvenation in the new millennium. Again, he skims before the 2002 era of Masters of the Universe and the time when there was essentially nothing. This was the time that Baer needed to be writing about what kept Masters of the Universe going, the fans. This was the time that fans were moving to the world-wide web and found each other on e-mail groups and eventually the He-Man.org. He doesn't acknowledge this part of the He-Man history. There was essentially a lot of individuals and groups that needed to be acknowledged, but the author just skips it all.
Baer's descriptions become static and reduces himself to just giving facts, while looking back at the earlier 80s incarnation with fondness. The 2002 era had an impact on the current status of the toy line that the author just didn't seem to appreciate. Mike Young Productions did produce some ground-breaking episodes that Baer just didn't indulge like how he did with Filmation. The Power of Grayskull episode broke ground and is often regarded as one of the greatest episodes in the He-Man mythos, but Baer just ignores it. At this point in 2002, toy designers The Four Horsemen are barely mentioned, but their impact on the toy line and modern interpretations of the characters feel like they were under appreciated. Again, Baer just seems to ignore the infamous collapse of the 2002 line or the struggle of getting the last waves of the toy line.
In the end, Baer barely acknowledges the Masters of the Universe Classics toy line and modern comics. He mistakenly implies that all the classic figures came with modern minicomics. As a controversial individual, Scott Nietlich did have a role worth mentioning in resurrecting Masters of the Universe toy line and history. The book fails to even mention him or his accomplishments. Baer focuses more on modern Transformers film and how movies based on toys have become more mainstream than when the Masters of the Universe was released in 1987. The classics line has achieved more than what the original toy line ever did. The line created figures that were never made in the original. For example, the create-a-figure contest winner from the 1980s, The Fearless Photog, was finally made into plastic form. As the DC comics were released, again, Baer just gives them some acknowledgement. He doesn't go into greater detail than what he did in the beginning with the 1980s toy versions and Filmation.
Baer barely achieves his goal by giving us a complete history of the Masters of the Universe. He provides insight and great details that many nostalgic fans might not be aware. At best, it serves as supplemental material to previously and future publications and documentaries. Because of his lack of attention in the later years, Baer did not write the definitive book on the history of Masters of the Universe. The author indulges with his favorite material too much, but just seems to skim over other parts. He completely ignores the live show Universal Studios once held and even the touring stage show with Songster. The book does feel incomplete and more attention should have been given over to the current material. We are in a second resurgence of the toy line with graphic novels, high-end action figures, and statues, but the author feels like it is not. He continues about pop culture and hopes to see the return of He-Man in film and TV. (As do we all.) He should have collaborated with others to complete sections he fell short on. The book has potential and it is worth a reading for the fan and nostalgia toy fans, but I do hope the author will eventually return and supplement his material.
- Book Review by Rene Chavez

NOTE:  The author of this article contributed in their individual capacity. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of He-Man.Org, MVCreations, or any other party.

Michael Donovan attending Power-Con 2017 March 24, 2017 3:46 pm by TheShadow

Michael Donovan is a talented voice actor who brought King Randor, Count Marzo, Tung Lashor, and Roboto to life in the 2002 Mike Young Productions He-Man and the Masters of the Universe series that aired on Cartoon Network while also serving as the Voice Director for the series. As an interesting twist, he also voiced General Nifel in Jetlag's New Adventures of He-Man along with other additional voices.

In addition to He-Man, Mr. Donovan has worked on a vast array of cartoon series including such popular titles as Captain N: The Game Master, King Arthur and the Knights of Justice, Conan: The Adventurer, Spider-Man Unlimited, Dragon Ball, ReBootX-Men: Evolution, and is currently Obi-Wan Kenobi in the LEGO Star Wars television franchises.

Power-Con: September 2017 

Owen Morton review: Episode 014 - Colossor Awakes March 24, 2017 1:47 am by JVS3

Owen Morton has posted a review of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, Episode 014 - Colossor Awakes.
Click here to check it out!
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums

MoneySuperMarket Skeletor commercial March 23, 2017 9:05 pm by JVS3

Moneyupermarket.com has a new, awesome commercial featuring He-Man and Skeletor.
Click here to check it out on Campaign Magazine.
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

Electrified Porcupine review: MOTUC Adora March 22, 2017 11:08 pm by JVS3

We flash back to an earlier release with this photo review by Beeternia and Electrified Porcupine. click here to check out his review of MOTUC Adora.
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

MOTUC Vikor video review by John Hale March 21, 2017 11:56 pm by JVS3

Flashing back to an earlier release, John Hale takes a look at MOTUC Vikor!
And click here to join the discussion about John's reviews on the He-Man.Org forums.

Tappers of Grayskull Week 1 tournament starts today!

Each tournament will last a week, and you can earn DOUBLE the amount of medals!
• The first tournament takes place March 21-24. Defeat Skeletor as many times as you can in the tournament to come out on top!
• For the second week of March 25-31, level up all your Masters as many times as possible and the players with the highest total of Master levels will be the tournament winners!
• Finally, for the third week of April 1-7, strike as many weak points as you can to win this round's tournaments.

Click here to download Tappers of Grayskull today!
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums.

He-Man.Org user Lich Leech walks through the designs and changes of artwork on the brand! This is part 1 of 6 of his look at the vintage MOTU boxart.

click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums.

Meg Foster attending Power-Con 2017 March 20, 2017 4:47 pm by TheShadow

Her masterful performance as Evil Lyn was one of the highlights of the 1987 Masters of the Universe live-action movie. Meg Foster has just been added to the guest list for Power-Con 2017.

Ms. Foster’s credits also include Cagney & Lacey, Quantum Leap, Star Trek Deep Space NineThe Originals, Pretty Little Liars, and as Hera in both Hercules: The Legendary Journeys and Xena: Warrior Princess.

INFO ABOUT TICKET AND EXCLUSIVE ORDERS
Many of you are waiting for details on pricing and when our sales will start for Power-Con 2017 tickets and exclusives pre-orders. We are currently working with the sales vendor on customizing the online sales. It’s taking a bit longer than we hoped, but it’s because our goal is to give you the most streamlined, easy order process yet for Power-Con. As soon as we have more info, we will be to share that with you. Thank you for your patience and support of Power-Con!

Nate Baertsch is sharing his MOTUC designs and sketches with fans. Today is his design for Talon Fighter. Click here to see and learn more about it directly from Nate on the He-Man.Org forums!

Dark Horse has provided He-Man.Org with the complete final cover for He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Character Guide and World Compendium. Click on the image at the bottom of this article to see it.

and click here to pre-order your copy today
And click here to join in at the discussions on He-Man.Org forums 

Starts shipping from Amazon on May 23rd, 2017

Info:
The universe of He-Man and She-Ra is full of mystery. And thanks to over four thousand individual entries covering characters, beasts, vehicles, locations, weapons and magic, you can learn the secrets of this entire universe! This is the most comprehensive guide ever published, covering all things Masters of the Universe and Princess of Power from 1982 through today

• Hardcover: 680 pages, 9" x 12"
• Publisher: Dark Horse Books
• Language: English
• ISBN-10: 1506701426

• ISBN-13: 978-150670142 

Axel Gimenez is sharing his MOTUC designs and sketches with fans. Today is the initial design for Red Beast. Click here to see and learn more about the design directly from Axel on the He-Man.Org forums!

MOTUC Multi-Bot Filmation upgrade by Zodac666 March 18, 2017 1:16 am by JVS3

MOTU Classics Multi-Bot gets a Filmation upgrade thanks to this custom by Zodac666 and Eternal Customs. Click here to see more of his work on the He-Man.Org forums!

Shadow Weaver bio by gbagok March 17, 2017 11:47 pm by JVS3

gbagok has been creating his own MOTUC bios for years. Here is his bio and artwork for Shadow Weaver! Click here to see more of his fan bio cards.

Tappers of Grayskull has let us know that the Week 1 tournament has been delayed until this Tuesday.

Each tournament will last a week, and you can earn DOUBLE the amount of medals!
• The first tournament takes place March 21-24. Defeat Skeletor as many times as you can in the tournament to come out on top!
• For the second week of March 25-31, level up all your Masters as many times as possible and the players with the highest total of Master levels will be the tournament winners!
• Finally, for the third week of April 1-7, strike as many weak points as you can to win this round's tournaments.

Click here to download Tappers of Grayskull today!
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums.

Owen Morton has posted a review of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, Episode 013 - Like Father, Like Daughter.
Click here to check it out!
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums

MOTUC Despara video review by John Hale March 16, 2017 8:47 pm by JVS3

Flashing back to an earlier release, John Hale takes a look at MOTUC Despara!
And click here to join the discussion about John's reviews on the He-Man.Org forums.

Mattel has shared two of the He-Man: The Eternity War story outlines with He-Man.Org. Published by DC Comics, these comics have been a hit with fans and these two outlines give us an inside look at the crafting of the stories within the issues.

Click here to read the Issue 9 outline.
Click here to read the Issue 15 outline.

Click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums.
And thanks to Mattel for sharing them with us!

Electrified Porcupine review: MOTUC Goddess March 15, 2017 6:32 pm by JVS3

We flash back to an earlier release with this photo review by Beeternia and Electrified Porcupine. click here to check out his review of MOTUC Goddess.
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

He-Man.Org user Lich Leech walks through the designs and changes of artwork on the brand! This time he takes a look at Fisto.

click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums.

How He-Man Mastered the Universe is now available March 13, 2017 8:00 pm by JVS3

How He-Man Mastered the Universe, written by Brian C. Baer, is now available! Details below, and click here to order your copy from Amazon.

Paperback: 228 pages
Publisher: McFarland (March 7, 2017)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1476665907
ISBN-13: 978-1476665900
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches

The author tells us "It's fresh from the printers. It's listed at $19.99, which I know sounds a little spendy, but is actually pretty low for McFarland. It's about 225 pages altogether, paperback, with a dozen or so black-and-white pictures inside.

The book itself, I think, is a little more catered to the casual fans, or a book for the more hardcore fans to point to when someone they know is curious about the franchise. I'm sure the hardcore He-Man fans will know most of the history and trivia in the book, but hopefully there's some interesting factoids in there for them, too. I got some fun new interviews with people like Tim Seeley, and there's some movie production art from Bill Stout which I'm pretty sure hasn't been published before...It's more about looking at the broader perspective of the evolution of pop culture and what role MOTU played in all of that.

When I say I've been a fan of of He-Man since the day I was born, I mean it literally. My older brother came to visit our mom and his newborn baby brother in the hospital that day, and he was wearing his favorite MOTU shirt and carrying the action figures. The most important thing to him was introducing me to his favorite toys and cartoon series. He-Man was a fixture in our home as I grew up. I was born in 1985, so I was a little too late for the cartoons in their original broadcasts, but we had plenty of episodes taped off of TV and most of the toys around. (I remember "Jacob and the Widgets" and the Man-E-Faces figure most vividly, so those get a special shout-out in the book.) As I got older, I grew to love the '87 movie more and more. I started collecting the trivia and trying to learn more about it. It just fascinated me that He-Man was the first toy to be turned into a cartoon and a live-action movie, two major pop culture milestones, but that wasn't a well-known fact to most laypeople. There wasn't even a book written about that! So I decided to write one, and after a few years of me looking around, I finally found a publisher who was interested in it - McFarland Books. They let me treat it as an argument, more or less, for why He-Man deserves more respect."

He-Man/Thundercats #6 Preview March 13, 2017 4:59 pm by JVS3

He-Man.Org has an exclusive preview of He-Man/Thundercats #6. Check out the images and description below,
and click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

ON SALE MARCH 15th
At your local comic shop,
or digitally from Amazon or Comixology.

HE-MAN/THUNDERCATS #6
The epic series comes to the only conclusion possible: all-out war against Mumm-Ra and Skeletor! He-Man and Lion-O confront the diabolical duo in the heart of the magical, mystical Castle Grayskull, but the battle royal quickly expands across the multiverse itself!

minicomic vintage Man-E-Faces by jjhuehn March 13, 2017 1:02 am by JVS3

vintage Man-E-Faces gets his minicomic colors thanks to this custom by jjhuehn. Click here to see more photos on the He-Man.Org forums!

Kon-Gor by mkULTRA March 12, 2017 9:29 pm by JVS3

MOTU gets a new warrior with this custom Kon-Gor by mkULTRA. Click here to see more photos on the He-Man.Org forums!

Battle-Armor He-Man by Vikorfan March 12, 2017 8:04 pm by JVS3

Check out this Battle-Armor He-Man fanart by Vikorfan. And click here to learn more about it on the He-Man.Org forums!

Clawhand by facet March 12, 2017 5:56 pm by JVS3

Check out this custom Clawhand by facet. And click here to learn more about it on the He-Man.Org forums!

MOTU universe has posted an interview with customizer Frikkie Stroebel from Blue Hand Customs. Click here to check it out!

Axel Gimenez MOTUC sketches and designs: Golden Rod March 12, 2017 12:19 am by JVS3

Axel Gimenez is sharing his MOTUC designs and sketches with fans. Today is the initial design for Golden Rod. Click here to see and learn more about the design directly from Axel on the He-Man.Org forums!

MOTUC Modulok Filmation upgrade by Zodac666 March 11, 2017 9:13 pm by JVS3

MOTU Classics Modulok gets a Filmation upgrade thanks to this custom by Zodac666 and Eternal Customs. Click here to see more of his work on the He-Man.Org forums!

For fans in or near San Diego, Super7 is having a 10% off sale today, March 11th at their 8th Avenue store to celebrate its two year anniversary. EVERYTHING in the store is 10% off!

Store hours are from 11am to 7pm Pacific,
and the store is located at
701 8th Avenue
San Diego, CA 92101

Tappers of Grayskull has sent over this awesome tournament update. There will be three new upcoming tournaments where you can earn DOUBLE the amount of medals!

Each tournament will last a week. **UPDATED**
• The first tournament takes place March 21-24. Defeat Skeletor as many times as you can in the tournament to come out on top!
• For the second week of March 25-31, level up all your Masters as many times as possible and the players with the highest total of Master levels will be the tournament winners!
• Finally, for the third week of April 1-7, strike as many weak points as you can to win this round's tournaments.

Click here to download Tappers of Grayskull today!
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums.

Pyroah bio by gbagok March 10, 2017 8:40 pm by JVS3

gbagok has been creating his own MOTUC bios for years. Here is his bio and artwork for Pyroah! Click here to see more of his fan bio cards.

Garry Chalk attending Power-Con 2017 March 10, 2017 5:05 pm by TheShadow

We are excited to begin to announce guests for Power-Con 2017!

First up is voice actor Garry Chalk. Garry was the voice of He-Man, Artilla, President Pell, Alcon, Krone, and Andros in the New Adventures of He-Man cartoon series as well as Man-At-Arms and Whiplash in the Mike Young Productions He-Man and the Masters of the Universe series on Cartoon Network.

In addition to his roles on various He-Man series, Garry has provided the voices for Optimus Primal of Beast Wars: Transformers and Beast Machines, as well the Optimus Prime in the anime English dubs of Transformers: Armada, Transformers Energon, and Transformers: Cybertron. He has lent his voice to over 30 animated television series and has been in films such as The Fly II, Godzilla, and Freddy vs. Jason.

INFO ABOUT TICKET AND EXCLUSIVE ORDERS
Many of you are waiting for details on pricing and when our sales will start for Power-Con 2017 tickets and exclusives pre-orders. We are currently working with the sales vendor on customizing the online sales. It's taking a bit longer than we hoped, but it's because our goal is to give you the most streamlined, easy order process yet for Power-Con. As soon as we have more info, we will be to share that with you. Thank you for your patience and support of Power-Con!

Final cover for He-Man / ThunderCats #6 March 10, 2017 12:33 am by JVS3

The final cover for He-Man / ThunderCats #6 has been posted. This issue will be released on March 15th. Click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

Owen Morton has posted a review of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, Episode 012 - Evil-Lyn's Plot.
Click here to check it out!
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums

FauxPop Media, the company behind the upcoming Power of Grayskull: The Definitive History of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, have let fans know they are working on the final segment of their distribution cut of the documentary. And a fan cut will follow!
Visit their Facebook page for more info.
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

Electrified Porcupine review: MOTUC King Randor March 8, 2017 8:33 pm by JVS3

We flash back to an earlier release with this photo review by Beeternia and Electrified Porcupine. click here to check out his review of MOTUC King Randor.
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

MOTUC Photo Art by zutton March 7, 2017 10:05 pm by JVS3

Prince Adam receives the Sword of Power in this image from a series of MOTUC photo art by zutton. Click here to see more of his photos on the He-Man.Org forums!

MOTUC Stinkor video review by John Hale March 7, 2017 7:06 pm by JVS3

Flashing back to an earlier release, John Hale takes a look at MOTUC Stinkor!
And click here to join the discussion about John's reviews on the He-Man.Org forums.

He-Man.Org user Lich Leech walks through the designs and changes of artwork on the brand! This time he takes a look at Buzz-Off.

click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums.

Masters go cuteness by Jarkkokarkko March 5, 2017 9:27 pm by JVS3

MOTU gets a touch of cuteness with this fanart by Jarkkokarkko. Click here to learn more about them on the He-Man.Org forums!

Gladiator by facet March 5, 2017 8:02 pm by JVS3

The MOTUC minicomic character is made real with this custom Gladiator by facet. Click here to see more photos on the He-Man.Org forums!

Frankenhorde by blacksun442 March 5, 2017 6:18 pm by JVS3

The Horde get a new 4-armed warrior with this custom Frankenhorde by blacksun442. Click here to see more photos on the He-Man.Org forums!

Axel Gimenez is sharing his MOTUC designs and sketches with fans. Today is the initial design for Strettch Nek and Vypor. Click here to see and learn more about the design directly from Axel on the He-Man.Org forums!

Check out this review from DailySkew of the He-Man & MOTU Newspaper Comic Strips collection from Dark Horse which is available now to purchase in comic shops, book stores, and online.
Click here to read the review,
click here to order on Amazon,
and click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

For fans in or near San Francisco, Super7 is having a 10% off sale today, March 4th at their Mission District store to celebrate it's one year anniversary. EVERYTHING in the store is 10% off!

Store hours are from 12pm to 7pm Pacific,
and the store is located at
3253 16th Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

MOTUC Tung Lashor Filmation upgrade by Zodac666 March 4, 2017 12:03 am by JVS3

MOTU Classics Tung Lashor gets a Filmation upgrade thanks to this custom by Zodac666 and Eternal Customs. Click here to see more of his work on the He-Man.Org forums!

Count Marzo bio by gbagok March 3, 2017 10:13 pm by JVS3

gbagok has been creating his own MOTUC bios for years. Here is his bio and artwork for Count Marzo! Click here to see more of his fan bio cards.

He-Man/She-Ra storyboards for sale! :) March 3, 2017 6:27 pm by Busta Toons

James Eatock is selling his remaining 23 He-Man and She-Ra storyboards on eBay - These were studio copies made in-house at Filmation for the directors - Pick up a piece of history! :)

Subscribe to He-Man.Org on YouTube March 3, 2017 3:27 pm by JVS3

He-Man.Org now has its own YouTube channel. Many of you asked for us to put Roast Gooble Dinner audio recordings on YouTube, and this will start with the next episode. We might even add older episodes. And any time we have a fun or interesting He-Man or She-Ra video, we will add it there as well.
Please kick here to visit our YouTube channel and be sure to Subscribe to it so you don't miss out when new audio or video is added!

Owen Morton has posted a review of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, Episode 011 – Masks of Power.
Click here to check it out!
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums

Jason Edmiston has posted the card art from wave 3 of Super7's MOTU ReAction line. Click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

For the time being, the He-Man Newspaper Comic Strips collection from Dark Horse is on sale at Amazon for a whopping 48% off! Get your copy for only $15.59!

Click here to order today on Amazon,
and click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

Electrified Porcupine review: MOTUC Scare Glow March 2, 2017 12:09 am by JVS3

We flash back to an earlier release with this photo review by Beeternia and Electrified Porcupine. click here to check out his review of MOTUC Scare Glow.
And click here to join the discussion on the He-Man.Org forums!

MOTUC Lizard Man video review by John Hale March 1, 2017 8:20 pm by JVS3

Flashing back to an earlier release, John Hale takes a look at MOTUC Lizard Man!
And click here to join the discussion about John's reviews on the He-Man.Org forums.

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