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Thread: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

  1. #1151
    Not my Tempo Fendi's Avatar
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    13 days after new year: Another strict Lockdown in Malaysia for 2 weeks. Until 26th of January.

    *sigh* I wanna work so bad, it feel like a routine going there but having fun poking each other in the office and...... Hey my gaming backlogs

    Playing a three-hour Rush show is like running a marathon while solving equations.

  2. #1152
    Master of New Adventures!
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    I get my first of two vaccine shots one month from yesterday. Kim and I are totally sheltering in place until a week after I get the second injection. Because I'm at so much risk for complications and death if I contract COVID-19 as a result of my underlying health issues, we've discontinued our housekeepers and are only allowing our children into our home until I'm totally vaccinated. I'm literally counting the days.

    I'll let you know if I end up growing an extra eighteen fingers or exhale flames after the vaccinations.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Good Lord...

    https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/14/healt...day/index.html

  3. #1153
    Heroic Warrior Thrawn29's Avatar
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    The hospital I work at has vaccinated over 1600 employees so far; doctors, nurses, etc.

    I took the Moderna vaccine last Tuesday. It was the only one offered.

    No issues so far. My arm hurt like hell 13 hours later for about a day. Ibuprofen took care of it.

    Pretty big spikes in hospitalizations. They've taken over half our ICU and two med surg floors so far. Most of the cases are less severe not requiring ICU beds. Most are elderly.

    Not very fun, but it could be a lot worse.
    Last edited by Thrawn29; January 15, 2021 at 06:46am.

  4. #1154
    Not my Tempo Fendi's Avatar
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    Not to sound pessimist or crazy but, did people just "celebrate" and break the distancing rules after the vaccine news?

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  5. #1155
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fendi View Post
    Not to sound pessimist or crazy but, did people just "celebrate" and break the distancing rules after the vaccine news?
    From what Iíve seen since the beginning there was really no ďdistancingĒ. People wear masks but whenever Iím out in public people are standing on top of one another.

    On the bright side my wife received the vaccine last week. Everything went well except for a sore arm for about half a day. She said the feeling is very comparable to a tetanus shot
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  6. #1156
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    Does anybody else carry a spare mask to give someone in need? I have a sealed mask in my purse just for the purpose.

    Also, the isolation and depression is real.
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  7. #1157
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    Always, in my pocket and in my car. It's a cliche that "we're all in this together", but it's true.

    That said, I know some people are still sensitive about masks, although less so than a few months ago. So I never push myself on someone. If someone looks like they forgot their mask -- and I know that look because I've had it myself walking into a grocery store -- I'll respectfully and gently tell them I have spare and will be happy to give it to them. This has happened on three or four occasions and so far I haven't had anyone reactive negatively.

    And that note, I'll ask a question: On numerous occasions I've seen people wearing a mask in which their nose is completely exposed. Obviously, that's not the way to wear a mask. But I'm reluctant to point that out to them. How do you and other orgers react if you encounter this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Laura Gill View Post
    Does anybody else carry a spare mask to give someone in need? I have a sealed mask in my purse just for the purpose.

    Also, the isolation and depression is real.

  8. #1158
    Heroic Warrior Laura Gill's Avatar
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    I only point it out if I'm already in a conversation with somebody.

    Two days ago I was at CVS to get a prescription and this woman who wasn't wearing a mask went off on the staff saying they were all liars and complaining that she had to leave. I just nope-d right on out of there without even offering her a mask because somebody else did and she barked at them that it wasn't their business. Uh, it kind of IS everybody's business, but I'm just going to excuse myself now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Heeeere's Olesker! View Post
    Always, in my pocket and in my car. It's a cliche that "we're all in this together", but it's true.

    That said, I know some people are still sensitive about masks, although less so than a few months ago. So I never push myself on someone. If someone looks like they forgot their mask -- and I know that look because I've had it myself walking into a grocery store -- I'll respectfully and gently tell them I have spare and will be happy to give it to them. This has happened on three or four occasions and so far I haven't had anyone reactive negatively.

    And that note, I'll ask a question: On numerous occasions I've seen people wearing a mask in which their nose is completely exposed. Obviously, that's not the way to wear a mask. But I'm reluctant to point that out to them. How do you and other orgers react if you encounter this?
    Formerly known as Granamyr on the Forum.

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  9. #1159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thrawn29 View Post
    The hospital I work at has vaccinated over 1600 employees so far; doctors, nurses, etc.

    I took the Moderna vaccine last Tuesday. It was the only one offered.

    No issues so far. My arm hurt like hell 13 hours later for about a day. Ibuprofen took care of it.

    Pretty big spikes in hospitalizations. They've taken over half our ICU and two med surg floors so far. Most of the cases are less severe not requiring ICU beds. Most are elderly.

    Not very fun, but it could be a lot worse.
    I'm curious, why did you take the vaccine after having had COVID-19 a few months back?

  10. #1160
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    The jury is still out on how long one has immunity after having had COVID-19. The latest estimate is three months, but no one knows for sure.

    From a January 4, 2021 CDC update:

    "If I have already had COVID-19 and recovered, do I still need to get vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine?

    Yes. Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and the fact that re-infection with COVID-19 is possible, vaccine should be offered to you regardless of whether you already had COVID-19 infection. CDC is providing recommendations to federal, state, and local governments about who should be vaccinated first.

    At this time, experts do not know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called natural immunity, varies from person to person. Some early evidence suggests natural immunity may not last very long.

    We won’t know how long immunity produced by vaccination lasts until we have more data on how well the vaccines work.

    Both natural immunity and vaccine-induced immunity are important aspects of COVID-19 that experts are trying to learn more about, and CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available."


    Quote Originally Posted by The All American View Post
    I'm curious, why did you take the vaccine after having had COVID-19 a few months back?
    Last edited by Heeeere's Olesker!; January 15, 2021 at 11:39pm.

  11. #1161
    Heroic Warrior Thrawn29's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The All American View Post
    I'm curious, why did you take the vaccine after having had COVID-19 a few months back?
    Several reasons.

    I've read new studies that seem to indicated a fairly large drop in anti-bodies post COVID after 3-5 months. I fall into that range now (had it back on October).

    Second was changing conditions on the ground. We have experienced a surge in COVID patients in my hospital - most of whom are fine, but the logistics of taking care of them are more time consuming. You have to gown, mask, glove, etc, every time you go into the room for any little thing.

    We have a lot of med surg nurses taking care of them now. There's a huge gulf in competency among different nurses (as in every profession).

    On top of that the hospital is very short staffed (many people have left for travel contracts) so they're getting the legal maximum number of patients. ICU is tripled, and the poor med surg nurses are getting 7 COVID patients. That's too many.

    We had one patient during the week come back positive for COVID unexpectedly, and one of the nurses who had that patient during the week came back positive.

    The CDC has lowered the guidelines, recommending no symptoms for 10 days you're technically not positive if you're symptomatic (even if they test are still positive). I don't like that.

    Staff are also being encouraged to come in as long as they're asymptomatic for 10 days or if they have no fever.

    Hm.

    I already beat COVID in two weeks without any difficulty and I'm fairly certain I could do so again, but it's clear that due to staffing issues and administrative decisions it's inevitable that I will get it again due to the continuous exposure I have.

    Contrary to popular belief, wearing masks are not a magic bullet to prevent COVID. I observe proper PPE use and I still got it.

    The Moderna vaccine is not a live virus, there's no unusual ingredients in it, it's supposed to last at least a year.

    We don't have any long term data on the effects of the vaccine, but given reality of my situation that I deal with COVID 3-4 days a week, the risks vs benefits for me seemed to fall on the side of vaccination.

    I have always fallen on the side of I believe the vaccine will be ultimately be fine, and we've been offering the vaccine for about a month now, so I waited until the employees or really needed it (due to health concerns for themselves or their families).

    The new email I received tonight (I'm at work right now) stated we've vaccinated over 2660 employees. That's 2660 employees who with continuous exposure who should now have a 94% chance at immunity. That's a good thing in my opinion.
    Last edited by Thrawn29; January 16, 2021 at 12:59am.

  12. #1162
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heeeere's Olesker! View Post
    And that note, I'll ask a question: On numerous occasions I've seen people wearing a mask in which their nose is completely exposed. Obviously, that's not the way to wear a mask. But I'm reluctant to point that out to them. How do you and other orgers react if you encounter this?

    I'm "one of those people" that actually has Bronchiectasis, which obstructs my breathing. I only cover my nose when I'm at work or on a plane (where I also wear a PPE visor in addition to my mask), where I'm in close contact with others. Otherwise I stay a minimum of 10 feet from people in public. If you want to get close to me while I'm actively trying to avoid you, it's kinda on you at that point. And if you want to "school me" about not covering my nostrils, I'm happy to school you about Bronchiectasis and why it makes my life a living hell.

    I don't *not* cover my nostrils as a political statement. Under federal law I'm not required to cover my face at all in most circumstances, and a private business can be sued under the ADA if they wish to pursue it to that end. I find it disheartening that I have to "carry my paperwork" to share with non-medically trained strangers who are more concerned with store policy than discriminatory behaviour.

    I just ask to be left alone. If I could stay home and shun public interaction altogether, I would. I'm not your enemy, and I wear a mask I'm not required to wear specifically to avoid confrontation from the zealots who think they're accomplishing something by finger wagging and publicly shaming people who don't meet their standard of virus prevention.

    I'm kinda salty at this point because today was about the thirtieth time since last March I've gotten into a verbal altercation with someone who tried to belittle me for not covering my nostrils at Krogers. I come in early at opening and late at closing because I don't want to be around people, especially a Karen on a witchhunt. This virus has made people stupid. It's brought out the worst in people. The fear has paralyzed the populace.
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  13. #1163
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    Isnít accepting a mask that someone has handed to you a bit risky? What are the rules for mask wearing in the states, in the UK there are genuine reasons where people are exempt from mask wearing, medical reasons being one of them, so the people I see without masks I have to assume have genuine reasons for not wearing them, thatís possibly not always the case.

  14. #1164
    Heroic Warrior Night Stalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by felgekarp View Post
    Isnít accepting a mask that someone has handed to you a bit risky? What are the rules for mask wearing in the states, in the UK there are genuine reasons where people are exempt from mask wearing, medical reasons being one of them, so the people I see without masks I have to assume have genuine reasons for not wearing them, thatís possibly not always the case.
    The rules vary by state and city, but most locations have a mask rule. On a federal level, people with recognized medical exemptions are not required to abide by the mask mandates, and private/public entities must accommodate these people or be held in violation of the Americans With Disabilities Act. Refusing someone service after they have indicated they are disabled is the same as telling someone they can't shop in your store because they're in a wheelchair.

    In reality, if a civil liberties lawyer were to pursue a lawsuit on behalf of those who have been discriminated against, the defendant could always claim they did so out of a public health concern. Companies like Wal-Mart and Krogers have entire armies of lawyers with a neverending cash flow, so they'd probably win. In America, it's rarely a matter of who is right or wrong in a court of law, it's whoever can afford the better legal team.
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  15. #1165
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    I certainly understand your point, Night Stalker and you have my deepest empathy.

    That said, you're the exception to the rule. I believe most people who don't cover their nose are doing it for (understandable) comfort. Regrettably, it puts others at risk for spreading the virus.

    If I mentioned a nose not being covered and someone told me that they had your condition, I would tell them that I completely understand.

    Quote Originally Posted by Night Stalker View Post
    I'm "one of those people" that actually has Bronchiectasis, which obstructs my breathing. I only cover my nose when I'm at work or on a plane (where I also wear a PPE visor in addition to my mask), where I'm in close contact with others. Otherwise I stay a minimum of 10 feet from people in public. If you want to get close to me while I'm actively trying to avoid you, it's kinda on you at that point. And if you want to "school me" about not covering my nostrils, I'm happy to school you about Bronchiectasis and why it makes my life a living hell.

    I don't *not* cover my nostrils as a political statement. Under federal law I'm not required to cover my face at all in most circumstances, and a private business can be sued under the ADA if they wish to pursue it to that end. I find it disheartening that I have to "carry my paperwork" to share with non-medically trained strangers who are more concerned with store policy than discriminatory behaviour.

    I just ask to be left alone. If I could stay home and shun public interaction altogether, I would. I'm not your enemy, and I wear a mask I'm not required to wear specifically to avoid confrontation from the zealots who think they're accomplishing something by finger wagging and publicly shaming people who don't meet their standard of virus prevention.

    I'm kinda salty at this point because today was about the thirtieth time since last March I've gotten into a verbal altercation with someone who tried to belittle me for not covering my nostrils at Krogers. I come in early at opening and late at closing because I don't want to be around people, especially a Karen on a witchhunt. This virus has made people stupid. It's brought out the worst in people. The fear has paralyzed the populace.
    - - - Updated - - -

    Thrawn 29,

    I'm a seventy-one year old male in excellent shape except for an underlying health issue that my physicians are working on positively resolving.

    Indiana recently announced it will be administering COVID-19 vaccine to residents under the age of 80. I'm scheduled to receive my first vaccination on February 13th.

    From what I read in your post, it sounds like the Moderna vaccine is preferable -- longer immunity. As a medical professional, do you know if I will be able to specify which vaccine I will get or is it just the luck of the draw -- i.e., depending on which the hospital I'm going to has on hand?

    Quote Originally Posted by Thrawn29 View Post
    Several reasons.

    I've read new studies that seem to indicated a fairly large drop in anti-bodies post COVID after 3-5 months. I fall into that range now (had it back on October).

    Second was changing conditions on the ground. We have experienced a surge in COVID patients in my hospital - most of whom are fine, but the logistics of taking care of them are more time consuming. You have to gown, mask, glove, etc, every time you go into the room for any little thing.

    We have a lot of med surg nurses taking care of them now. There's a huge gulf in competency among different nurses (as in every profession).

    On top of that the hospital is very short staffed (many people have left for travel contracts) so they're getting the legal maximum number of patients. ICU is tripled, and the poor med surg nurses are getting 7 COVID patients. That's too many.

    We had one patient during the week come back positive for COVID unexpectedly, and one of the nurses who had that patient during the week came back positive.

    The CDC has lowered the guidelines, recommending no symptoms for 10 days you're technically not positive if you're symptomatic (even if they test are still positive). I don't like that.

    Staff are also being encouraged to come in as long as they're asymptomatic for 10 days or if they have no fever.

    Hm.

    I already beat COVID in two weeks without any difficulty and I'm fairly certain I could do so again, but it's clear that due to staffing issues and administrative decisions it's inevitable that I will get it again due to the continuous exposure I have.

    Contrary to popular belief, wearing masks are not a magic bullet to prevent COVID. I observe proper PPE use and I still got it.

    The Moderna vaccine is not a live virus, there's no unusual ingredients in it, it's supposed to last at least a year.

    We don't have any long term data on the effects of the vaccine, but given reality of my situation that I deal with COVID 3-4 days a week, the risks vs benefits for me seemed to fall on the side of vaccination.

    I have always fallen on the side of I believe the vaccine will be ultimately be fine, and we've been offering the vaccine for about a month now, so I waited until the employees or really needed it (due to health concerns for themselves or their families).

    The new email I received tonight (I'm at work right now) stated we've vaccinated over 2660 employees. That's 2660 employees who with continuous exposure who should now have a 94% chance at immunity. That's a good thing in my opinion.

  16. #1166
    Heroic Warrior Iluvart's Avatar
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    It appears that the Pfizer vaccine is a risk for people who are elderly and have underlying health conditions.

    "Norway expressed increasing concern about the safety of the Pfizer Inc. vaccine on elderly people with serious underlying health conditions after raising an estimate of the number who died after receiving inoculations to 29."

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...der-rise-to-29

  17. #1167
    Heroic Warrior MJOLNIR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iluvart View Post
    It appears that the Pfizer vaccine is a risk for people who are elderly and have underlying health conditions.

    "Norway expressed increasing concern about the safety of the Pfizer Inc. vaccine on elderly people with serious underlying health conditions after raising an estimate of the number who died after receiving inoculations to 29."

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...der-rise-to-29
    My mother was required to get the vaccine for work due to her age. In order to receive the vaccine she had to sign a waiver giving up any right to sue for any adverse affects from the vaccine. I don't know if the waiver was per PFiser or the facility that administrated it. It's shady. Thalidomide shady. I'm not one of these anti-vaccine conspiracy theorists but I don't trust a panacea that was rushed through the normal fail safes for political points.

  18. #1168
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    Thanks for that, Iluvart. I'll discuss with my physicians.

    Quote Originally Posted by Iluvart View Post
    It appears that the Pfizer vaccine is a risk for people who are elderly and have underlying health conditions.

    "Norway expressed increasing concern about the safety of the Pfizer Inc. vaccine on elderly people with serious underlying health conditions after raising an estimate of the number who died after receiving inoculations to 29."

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...der-rise-to-29

  19. #1169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thrawn29 View Post
    Several reasons.

    I've read new studies that seem to indicated a fairly large drop in anti-bodies post COVID after 3-5 months. I fall into that range now (had it back on October).

    Second was changing conditions on the ground. We have experienced a surge in COVID patients in my hospital - most of whom are fine, but the logistics of taking care of them are more time consuming. You have to gown, mask, glove, etc, every time you go into the room for any little thing.

    We have a lot of med surg nurses taking care of them now. There's a huge gulf in competency among different nurses (as in every profession).

    On top of that the hospital is very short staffed (many people have left for travel contracts) so they're getting the legal maximum number of patients. ICU is tripled, and the poor med surg nurses are getting 7 COVID patients. That's too many.

    We had one patient during the week come back positive for COVID unexpectedly, and one of the nurses who had that patient during the week came back positive.

    The CDC has lowered the guidelines, recommending no symptoms for 10 days you're technically not positive if you're symptomatic (even if they test are still positive). I don't like that.

    Staff are also being encouraged to come in as long as they're asymptomatic for 10 days or if they have no fever.

    Hm.

    I already beat COVID in two weeks without any difficulty and I'm fairly certain I could do so again, but it's clear that due to staffing issues and administrative decisions it's inevitable that I will get it again due to the continuous exposure I have.

    Contrary to popular belief, wearing masks are not a magic bullet to prevent COVID. I observe proper PPE use and I still got it.

    The Moderna vaccine is not a live virus, there's no unusual ingredients in it, it's supposed to last at least a year.

    We don't have any long term data on the effects of the vaccine, but given reality of my situation that I deal with COVID 3-4 days a week, the risks vs benefits for me seemed to fall on the side of vaccination.

    I have always fallen on the side of I believe the vaccine will be ultimately be fine, and we've been offering the vaccine for about a month now, so I waited until the employees or really needed it (due to health concerns for themselves or their families).

    The new email I received tonight (I'm at work right now) stated we've vaccinated over 2660 employees. That's 2660 employees who with continuous exposure who should now have a 94% chance at immunity. That's a good thing in my opinion.
    Thank you for your insight as always.

    Would there have been repercussions had you not taken it? Does your hospital currently have a requirement or a certain goal? I know of several medical workers who have refused to take it so far. It's kind of hard for the hospitals to mandate it (at least here) because these hospitals cannot afford to lose anymore nurses or doctors.

    There's been no long term peer reviewed studies that I am aware of that have shown masks being reliable, especially in public settings, in preventing aerosol transmission given the size of the virus (1 micron or less in size), they pass right through. From my understanding, proper mask use in sterilized settings (such as a hospital) might be helpful. Do you think you may have gotten the virus outside of work?

    I find it both amusing and sad that people have this illusion of safety with the masks in public. I see them hanging from car mirrors. People fiddling with them. Reusing them. The masks have to be properly handled and disposed of. They're not supposed to be worn all day and especially not reused. The amount of bacteria and other things collecting on them cannot be healthy. Then compounded with the mental aspects, it's a mess and extremely detrimental to society, especially for children.



    Quote Originally Posted by MJOLNIR View Post
    My mother was required to get the vaccine for work due to her age. In order to receive the vaccine she had to sign a waiver giving up any right to sue for any adverse affects from the vaccine. I don't know if the waiver was per PFiser or the facility that administrated it. It's shady. Thalidomide shady. I'm not one of these anti-vaccine conspiracy theorists but I don't trust a panacea that was rushed through the normal fail safes for political points.
    You cannot sue the vaccine makers in this case. It dates back to a 1986 Supreme Court decision as vaccines are "unavoidably unsafe". https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/10pdf/09-152.pdf Vaccine makers cannot make vaccines without some potential debilitating or deadly side effects. It's just the nature of the beast. I think this is why all vaccines should be voluntary because the individual is taking the risk.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/supreme...alth-problems/


    I mentioned earlier in this thread many months ago (pages 32-33), approved vaccines typically take 10-20 years to release to market due to safety and efficacy testing. Safety being the main key in my opinion: https://www.vaccines.gov/basics/safety Cutting red tape and pushing through a vaccine at "warp speed" sounds like a nice effort but you're essentially a guinea pig if you take it at this point.

    It's all about risk, and the current best estimate IFR (infection fatality rates) for COVID-19 are not impressive: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...scenarios.html

    Scenario 5: Current Best Estimate
    0-19 years: 0.00003
    20-49 years: 0.0002
    50-69 years: 0.005
    70+ years: 0.054



    Pfizer has paid over 4 billion dollars in violations since 2000. They're not trustworthy. https://violationtracker.goodjobsfir...1YUQ2mh9hxVWS8

    Moderna had never brought a product to market before: https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/01/us/co...inical%20trial.

    I wouldn't feel too comfortable taking either of them, especially at "warp speed" with no legal recourse if you are injured. Also, they are based on mRNA vaccine technology which is new. Please keep in mind, trials are still ongoing. The Pfizer one has a completion date of January 27, 2023: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04368728

    What could possibly go wrong?

  20. #1170
    Heroic Warrior Thrawn29's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heeeere's Olesker! View Post

    Thrawn 29,

    From what I read in your post, it sounds like the Moderna vaccine is preferable -- longer immunity. As a medical professional, do you know if I will be able to specify which vaccine I will get or is it just the luck of the draw -- i.e., depending on which the hospital I'm going to has on hand?
    It's going to depend on where you are getting your vaccine from and what their storage capabilities are.

    https://www.verywellhealth.com/covid...rement-5091841

    The Pfizer vaccine has to be kept at colder temperatures and I believe most doctor's offices don't have storage at that temperature. I know that was the case at my doctor's office (that's what they told me).

    So it will depend.

    I preferred the Moderna and coincidentally my hospital only offered the Moderna - so my choice was made for me either way.
    Every body I know outside of work has also received the Moderna vaccine as well instead of the Pfizer or AstraZeneca.

    But at the end of the day I don't think it matters.

    I suspect you'll end up with the Moderna yourself probably.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by The All American View Post
    Thank you for your insight as always.

    Would there have been repercussions had you not taken it? Does your hospital currently have a requirement or a certain goal? I know of several medical workers who have refused to take it so far. It's kind of hard for the hospitals to mandate it (at least here) because these hospitals cannot afford to lose anymore nurses or doctors.
    There has been no coercion or cheerleading that I am aware of. We get frequent emails making us aware of the vaccine's availability, how to sign up for it, "Dispelling Myths and Misinformation", etc.

    I know several employees who do not want to take it. It's all cool.


    Do you think you may have gotten the virus outside of work?
    Anything is possible, but I sincerely doubt it. Other than Walmart for groceries and the gas station I don't really go anywhere since I am dealing with a full time work and school schedule.

    Walmart at the time was requiring masks, so I respected their policies.

    It was ironic. I had some of the sickest COVID patients on the planet for 5 months straight in ICU. Then my unit was finally reopened (Critical care with no COVID patients), so after having COVID patients for 5 months, I caught it after I had my last COVID patient.

    I still get floated routinely to ICU and the med surg floors for COVID patients but at least I get a break here and there.

    I find it both amusing and sad that people have this illusion of safety with the masks in public. I see them hanging from car mirrors. People fiddling with them. Reusing them. The masks have to be properly handled and disposed of. They're not supposed to be worn all day and especially not reused. The amount of bacteria and other things collecting on them cannot be healthy. Then compounded with the mental aspects, it's a mess and extremely detrimental to society, especially for children.
    I agree.
    Last edited by Thrawn29; January 17, 2021 at 01:32am.

  21. #1171
    Master of New Adventures!
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    Your stats are correct. But there is another consideration. While having had a heart attack or stroke does not increase the chance of contracting the virus, individuals who do contract COVID-19 who are recovering from a heart attack or a stroke are six times more likely to be hospitalized and twelve times more likely to die is hospitalized than people who have not had a heart attack or a stroke.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-h...dy-idUSKBN23N\

    Quote Originally Posted by The All American View Post
    Thank you for your insight as always.

    Would there have been repercussions had you not taken it? Does your hospital currently have a requirement or a certain goal? I know of several medical workers who have refused to take it so far. It's kind of hard for the hospitals to mandate it (at least here) because these hospitals cannot afford to lose anymore nurses or doctors.

    There's been no long term peer reviewed studies that I am aware of that have shown masks being reliable, especially in public settings, in preventing aerosol transmission given the size of the virus (1 micron or less in size), they pass right through. From my understanding, proper mask use in sterilized settings (such as a hospital) might be helpful. Do you think you may have gotten the virus outside of work?

    I find it both amusing and sad that people have this illusion of safety with the masks in public. I see them hanging from car mirrors. People fiddling with them. Reusing them. The masks have to be properly handled and disposed of. They're not supposed to be worn all day and especially not reused. The amount of bacteria and other things collecting on them cannot be healthy. Then compounded with the mental aspects, it's a mess and extremely detrimental to society, especially for children.





    You cannot sue the vaccine makers in this case. It dates back to a 1986 Supreme Court decision as vaccines are "unavoidably unsafe". https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/10pdf/09-152.pdf Vaccine makers cannot make vaccines without some potential debilitating or deadly side effects. It's just the nature of the beast. I think this is why all vaccines should be voluntary because the individual is taking the risk.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/supreme...alth-problems/


    I mentioned earlier in this thread many months ago (pages 32-33), approved vaccines typically take 10-20 years to release to market due to safety and efficacy testing. Safety being the main key in my opinion: https://www.vaccines.gov/basics/safety Cutting red tape and pushing through a vaccine at "warp speed" sounds like a nice effort but you're essentially a guinea pig if you take it at this point.

    It's all about risk, and the current best estimate IFR (infection fatality rates) for COVID-19 are not impressive: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...scenarios.html

    Scenario 5: Current Best Estimate
    0-19 years: 0.00003
    20-49 years: 0.0002
    50-69 years: 0.005
    70+ years: 0.054



    Pfizer has paid over 4 billion dollars in violations since 2000. They're not trustworthy. https://violationtracker.goodjobsfir...1YUQ2mh9hxVWS8

    Moderna had never brought a product to market before: https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/01/us/co...inical%20trial.

    I wouldn't feel too comfortable taking either of them, especially at "warp speed" with no legal recourse if you are injured. Also, they are based on mRNA vaccine technology which is new. Please keep in mind, trials are still ongoing. The Pfizer one has a completion date of January 27, 2023: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04368728

    What could possibly go wrong?

  22. #1172
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thrawn29 View Post
    There has been no coercion or cheerleading that I am aware of. We get frequent emails making us aware of the vaccine's availability, how to sign up for it, "Dispelling Myths and Misinformation", etc.

    I know several employees who do not want to take it. It's all cool.




    Anything is possible, but I sincerely doubt it. Other than Walmart for groceries and the gas station I don't really go anywhere since I am dealing with a full time work and school schedule.

    Walmart at the time was requiring masks, so I respected their policies.

    It was ironic. I had some of the sickest COVID patients on the planet for 5 months straight in ICU. Then my unit was finally reopened (Critical care with no COVID patients), so after having COVID patients for 5 months, I caught it after I had my last COVID patient.

    I still get floated routinely to ICU and the med surg floors for COVID patients but at least I get a break here and there.



    I agree.
    That's good there has been no coercion or cheerleading where you work.

    I have a feeling Wal-Marts are probably breeding grounds given they attract the masses and there is a lot of touching of objects; however, maybe not since it is still a fairly open set-up. I really don't know. I hope there are a lot more long term scientific studies on viral transmission in the future so we can better understand the risky places.



    Quote Originally Posted by Heeeere's Olesker! View Post
    Your stats are correct. But there is another consideration. While having had a heart attack or stroke does not increase the chance of contracting the virus, individuals who do contract COVID-19 who are recovering from a heart attack or a stroke are six times more likely to be hospitalized and twelve times more likely to die is hospitalized than people who have not had a heart attack or a stroke.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-h...dy-idUSKBN23N\
    The link seems to broken, but generally, hey, I totally understand why someone older may want to take it. It's all about risk. My elderly cousin lost her half-brother and his wife (they were in their upper 70's) due to COVID-19 in California last week. If I was elderly, I'd have to weigh if it's worth the risk because I'd have less years ahead of me.

    I will say, given what you've wrote about your fitness and diet routines, you probably are in better shape than most people your age (and my age) and have a lot of Power-Cons ahead of you.

    While I'm personally wary of all of these rushed vaccines with no legal recourse, if someone wants to take something, it is not my business and it is their personal choice. I am against force, and pro informed choice.


    One thing I'd like to add, I am really curious what the IFR of a bad influenza is. There's been no consensus I can find. This tries to settle it but the IFRs for COVID-19 cited are way higher than the CDC's: https://medium.com/microbial-instinc...u-8148e38b9ab5 I think if a case could be easily made with numbers about how more dangerous COVID-19 is versus a bad flu strain, more people would respect the dangers of the virus. I look at the CDC's numbers and they don't add up to justify the harsh restrictions for what is something most age groups could easily achieve needed natural herd immunity while we could safely protect the vulnerable in the meantime.

  23. #1173
    Not my Tempo Fendi's Avatar
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    Right now I'm just frustrated that my mother's, deceased paperwork procedure including final will, will take a long time to complete over Covid. It just impossible that for me I've been toying a lot by Covid.

    Playing a three-hour Rush show is like running a marathon while solving equations.

  24. #1174
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    Thank you for that, The All-American. I'm so accustomed to multitudes of orgers in The Tar Swamp railing against anything and everything I post that it's certainly refreshing to find someone who can acknowledge that someone other than themselves has a valid point, even if it's one they don't 100% agree with.

    You're right that I lead healthy lifestyle, but the reality is that I do have underlying health issues that, at age 71, put me at increased risk of hospitalization and death if I contract COVID-19. That's why, along with my desire to be at many future Power-Cons and to live to see grandchildren -- I've elected to be vaccinated, which will start on February 13.

    Stay tuned to see if I end up with immunity or grow eighteen extra fingers overnight.

    Quote Originally Posted by The All American View Post
    That's good there has been no coercion or cheerleading where you work.

    I have a feeling Wal-Marts are probably breeding grounds given they attract the masses and there is a lot of touching of objects; however, maybe not since it is still a fairly open set-up. I really don't know. I hope there are a lot more long term scientific studies on viral transmission in the future so we can better understand the risky places.





    The link seems to broken, but generally, hey, I totally understand why someone older may want to take it. It's all about risk. My elderly cousin lost her half-brother and his wife (they were in their upper 70's) due to COVID-19 in California last week. If I was elderly, I'd have to weigh if it's worth the risk because I'd have less years ahead of me.

    I will say, given what you've wrote about your fitness and diet routines, you probably are in better shape than most people your age (and my age) and have a lot of Power-Cons ahead of you.

    While I'm personally wary of all of these rushed vaccines with no legal recourse, if someone wants to take something, it is not my business and it is their personal choice. I am against force, and pro informed choice.


    One thing I'd like to add, I am really curious what the IFR of a bad influenza is. There's been no consensus I can find. This tries to settle it but the IFRs for COVID-19 cited are way higher than the CDC's: https://medium.com/microbial-instinc...u-8148e38b9ab5 I think if a case could be easily made with numbers about how more dangerous COVID-19 is versus a bad flu strain, more people would respect the dangers of the virus. I look at the CDC's numbers and they don't add up to justify the harsh restrictions for what is something most age groups could easily achieve needed natural herd immunity while we could safely protect the vulnerable in the meantime.

  25. #1175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heeeere's Olesker! View Post
    Stay tuned to see if I end up with immunity or grow eighteen extra fingers overnight.
    I've gotten the vaccine and I'm fine.... second does in a couple of weeks. You'll be alright, Jack. Your arm will hurt for a day or two and that's about it. Glad you're on the books to get it.

    -Johnny C

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