Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 59

Thread: Why Mattel Produced Stratos in Two Alternate Variations: A Hypothesis

  1. #1
    Heroic Warrior Springor Spanior's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    151

    Why Mattel Produced Stratos in Two Alternate Variations: A Hypothesis

    Has anyone ever wondered why Mattel produced Stratos accessories in two different color variations? The original artwork design by Mark Taylor envisions Stratos with a red pack and blue wings. So, why, then would Mattel produce a red pack / blue wings version and a blue pack / red wings version? I offer for discussion a reason why this had to be done, and as alway, it has to do with the method of production and cost savings.

    A little while back on the mysterious Wonder Bread He-Man thread, someone posted a picture of the Castle Grayskull weapons still on a “tree”. That picture of the weapons got me thinking about the manufacture of all MOTU accessories. I realized that virtually all MOTU accessories must have been manufactured in this same method, where a master mold consisted of multiple cavities that were part of the same batch belonging to a particular figure or playset. If you look at the “tree”, you can see it is essentially the pathway for the injected plastic to travel to the mold cavities that represent weapons and such. When the plastic hardens, then the entire tree is popped out of the mold. I believe that the accessories for each of the original eight MOTU characters were produced in this same method. Pick up any He-Man or Skeletor sword, axe, harness or whatever, and there is always one rough little part where it was broken off from the tree, presumably by hand, and then packaged or applied to the figure. This means that, for example, in the case of He-Man, the mold should have five cavities representing the shield back, shield front, axe, sword and harness. When the pressing is completed, someone breaks the pieces off of the tree, assembles the shield, puts the harness on He-Man and sends him off for spray painting and packages the weapons in a baggie.

    Each of the eight original figures' accessories consist of a single, uniform color for the harness and the weapon accessories - except for Stratos. His design called for two different colors. (I'm ignoring Beast Man's black whip because that was simply a re-use of a Big Jim whip.) Could it be that having two colors presented a manufacturing problem when the accessories were made using the plastic injection molding method? I suspect back then they couldn't readily inject two different colors into the same mold. The best they could do was run two separate pressings using different color plastic - one blue pressing and one red pressing. But then you have extra wasted pieces - UNLESS you create two alternate versions of the accessories, then you efficiently use all of the accessories produced from that mold.

    Just a thought.
    I'm losing my edge, but I was there. LCD Soundsystem

  2. #2

  3. #3
    Heroic Warrior jzguitars's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Edison, NJ
    Posts
    555
    Quote Originally Posted by Springor Spanior View Post
    Has anyone ever wondered why Mattel produced Stratos accessories in two different color variations? The original artwork design by Mark Taylor envisions Stratos with a red pack and blue wings. So, why, then would Mattel produce a red pack / blue wings version and a blue pack / red wings version? I offer for discussion a reason why this had to be done, and as alway, it has to do with the method of production and cost savings.

    A little while back on the mysterious Wonder Bread He-Man thread, someone posted a picture of the Castle Grayskull weapons still on a “tree”. That picture of the weapons got me thinking about the manufacture of all MOTU accessories. I realized that virtually all MOTU accessories must have been manufactured in this same method, where a master mold consisted of multiple cavities that were part of the same batch belonging to a particular figure or playset. If you look at the “tree”, you can see it is essentially the pathway for the injected plastic to travel to the mold cavities that represent weapons and such. When the plastic hardens, then the entire tree is popped out of the mold. I believe that the accessories for each of the original eight MOTU characters were produced in this same method. Pick up any He-Man or Skeletor sword, axe, harness or whatever, and there is always one rough little part where it was broken off from the tree, presumably by hand, and then packaged or applied to the figure. This means that, for example, in the case of He-Man, the mold should have five cavities representing the shield back, shield front, axe, sword and harness. When the pressing is completed, someone breaks the pieces off of the tree, assembles the shield, puts the harness on He-Man and sends him off for spray painting and packages the weapons in a baggie.

    Each of the eight original figures' accessories consist of a single, uniform color for the harness and the weapon accessories - except for Stratos. His design called for two different colors. (I'm ignoring Beast Man's black whip because that was simply a re-use of a Big Jim whip.) Could it be that having two colors presented a manufacturing problem when the accessories were made using the plastic injection molding method? I suspect back then they couldn't readily inject two different colors into the same mold. The best they could do was run two separate pressings using different color plastic - one blue pressing and one red pressing. But then you have extra wasted pieces - UNLESS you create two alternate versions of the accessories, then you efficiently use all of the accessories produced from that mold.

    Just a thought.
    Why wouldn't they run a tree of just wings, and just jetpacks in the colors they need? I seriously doubt they would have the jetpack and wings in the same mold knowing they're supposed to be different colors going into it. When they mold the He-Man accessories, it wasn't one set on one tree, it was a tree of 50 swords, a tree of 50 axes, a tree of 50 harnesses...etc.

    It's a cool hypothesis but it's just not how they were produced. Imagine the chaos when packaging if there was just a jumble of mixed parts in a bin. They separate each piece into separate bins and pickers take one of each down an assembly line. The grayskull parts were molded with all the weapons on one tree because they included the whole tree in the box and we picked them off ourselves. The process for figures is completely different.

  4. #4
    Heroic Warrior Springor Spanior's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by jzguitars View Post
    Why wouldn't they run a tree of just wings, and just jetpacks in the colors they need? I seriously doubt they would have the jetpack and wings in the same mold knowing they're supposed to be different colors going into it. When they mold the He-Man accessories, it wasn't one set on one tree, it was a tree of 50 swords, a tree of 50 axes, a tree of 50 harnesses...etc.

    It's a cool hypothesis but it's just not how they were produced. Imagine the chaos when packaging if there was just a jumble of mixed parts in a bin. They separate each piece into separate bins and pickers take one of each down an assembly line. The grayskull parts were molded with all the weapons on one tree because they included the whole tree in the box and we picked them off ourselves. The process for figures is completely different.
    I think if they had two separate "trees" (or mold casings), then they would have needed an extra plastic injection line, extra plastic melting unit, an extra hopper/feeder for the plastic pellets, and so forth. Instead, they make one master mold casing for all of the pieces - wings, arm bands, jet pack - and then they have one injection line for one complete unit. All they have to do is run through one injection with blue plastic, and then after that cools and is popped off, they run another injection with red plastic, rather than having two separate sets of equipment.
    I'm losing my edge, but I was there. LCD Soundsystem

  5. #5
    Master of Physics VZX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,730
    Quote Originally Posted by Springor Spanior View Post
    I think if they had two separate "trees" (or mold casings), then they would have needed an extra plastic injection line, extra plastic melting unit, an extra hopper/feeder for the plastic pellets, and so forth. Instead, they make one master mold casing for all of the pieces - wings, arm bands, jet pack - and then they have one injection line for one complete unit. All they have to do is run through one injection with blue plastic, and then after that cools and is popped off, they run another injection with red plastic, rather than having two separate sets of equipment.
    I like your hypothesis. But were there equal numbers of red wings + blue packs and blue wings + red packs? The Stratos I had as a kid was blue wings plus red pack. But I always thought it was weird that all the media had the reverse, but I did not mind.

    What did always bother me about Stratos is that he is the ONLY MotU figure to not come with at least one weapon. And it bugs me that the Origins does not have a weapon either. Grrr. And I love Stratos. He is such a weird character that I love so much. But give the guy a weapon!
    "Everything comes to he who waits."

  6. #6
    Heroic Warrior jzguitars's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Edison, NJ
    Posts
    555
    Quote Originally Posted by Springor Spanior View Post
    I think if they had two separate "trees" (or mold casings), then they would have needed an extra plastic injection line, extra plastic melting unit, an extra hopper/feeder for the plastic pellets, and so forth. Instead, they make one master mold casing for all of the pieces - wings, arm bands, jet pack - and then they have one injection line for one complete unit. All they have to do is run through one injection with blue plastic, and then after that cools and is popped off, they run another injection with red plastic, rather than having two separate sets of equipment.
    They had dozens of injection molding machines running at once, the logistics of separating red from blue for packaging alone is cost prohibitive. It's just not how it's done in a factory setting, keep in mind they produced millions of figures and even more accessories. Most of the molding process is automated, they mold a tree full of right wings, the machine pops them off the tree and into a hopper, these then go into bins for assembly line pickers to mate them to the bands and further down the line to be fit to the figure, then packaged. They simply did not mold one set on one tree...

  7. #7
    Heroic Warrior Springor Spanior's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by jzguitars View Post
    They had dozens of injection molding machines running at once, the logistics of separating red from blue for packaging alone is cost prohibitive. It's just not how it's done in a factory setting, keep in mind they produced millions of figures and even more accessories. Most of the molding process is automated, they mold a tree full of right wings, the machine pops them off the tree and into a hopper, these then go into bins for assembly line pickers to mate them to the bands and further down the line to be fit to the figure, then packaged. They simply did not mold one set on one tree...
    I guess I assumed that the accessories, including both left and right wings, were all on the same tree, rather than having the right wings on a tree, left wings on a tree, etc. I was envisioning something like you see when you open a model car kit, with all of the pieces connected on a system of runners and sprues. But perhaps that is only done when the consumer is expected to take pieces off and build it, like with Castle Grayskull. Perhaps you are right, and the production looks more like a string of identical pieces all in a row, connected on the same runner.
    I'm losing my edge, but I was there. LCD Soundsystem

  8. #8
    Heroic Warrior Night Stalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,147
    My hypothesis is that someone in corporate said "hmm, let's reverse the colors" and so the change was made. Figures with cost cuts like Stratos (ie, no weapon) have a higher ceiling of wiggle room to make running aesthetic changes. Something relatively more complex like Ram Man wouldn't get such a change unless it was selling poorly and swapping some colors may help it sell better.
    Most wanted Origins figures: Mighty Spector, Fisto's Cousin's Babysitter, and Mer-Man's Seventh Grade Crush.

  9. #9
    Heroic Warrior Universe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    387
    I believe I posited a similar theory on the blue beard Stratos thread a couple of years back when the question arose of which came first - red or blue wing Stratos? I think they were produced simultaneously from the very beginning for this reason. I think it also had to do with marketing: all other 8-back figures had weapons, but Stratos didn't. Alternating colors was a way to make him a bit more interesting - maybe even get a few kids to buy one in each color.

    Quote Originally Posted by jzguitars View Post
    the logistics of separating red from blue for packaging alone is cost prohibitive.
    The same argument could be made against your theory that left wings and right wings were cast on separate trees. Whether your theory or Springor Spanior's, both hypotheses contain what we could imagine to be a cost-prohibitive inefficiency.
    Last edited by Universe; April 15, 2021 at 02:27am.

  10. #10
    Heroic Warrior jzguitars's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Edison, NJ
    Posts
    555
    Quote Originally Posted by Springor Spanior View Post
    I guess I assumed that the accessories, including both left and right wings, were all on the same tree, rather than having the right wings on a tree, left wings on a tree, etc. I was envisioning something like you see when you open a model car kit, with all of the pieces connected on a system of runners and sprues. But perhaps that is only done when the consumer is expected to take pieces off and build it, like with Castle Grayskull. Perhaps you are right, and the production looks more like a string of identical pieces all in a row, connected on the same runner.
    Look at his craziness...all injection molding machines. I don't think adding a machine for a specific color is an issue.
    But yes, playsets and things like the gray/maroon 5 weapon sets (the weapons pack and Man-E-Faces) were most likely produced on one tree, but because of the nature of assembling and packaging figures, they don't do it that way. It's amazing to see the innards of a toy factory...or any mass production factory.

    Injection-Molding-Machines.jpg

    assembly line.jpg

    ca-times.brightspotcdn.com.jpg

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Universe View Post
    I believe I posited a similar theory on the blue beard Stratos thread a couple of years back when the question arose of which came first - red or blue wing Stratos? I think they were produced simultaneously from the very beginning for this reason. I think it also had to do with marketing: all other 8-back figures had weapons, but Stratos didn't. Alternating colors was a way to make him a bit more interesting - maybe even get a few kids to buy one in each color.



    The same argument could be made against your theory that left wings and right wings were cast on separate trees. Whether your theory or Springor Spanior's, both hypotheses contain what we could imagine to be a cost-prohibitive inefficiency.
    Not really. An assembly line worker's sole job would be to install the left wing on Stratos...all day, every day that's what this person's job is. Another would be the right wing, and another would be the jet pack, etc. The process would be seriously complicated if right and left wings were molded on the same tree because they would have to be separated for the assembly line. The color at this point is irrelevant. Red, blue doesn't matter, you assemble whats in the bin in front of you mindlessly.

    What they do is have one machine make only right wings and have them automatically drop into a bin for assembly, same for the left, the jet pack, etc. This is how it's done when you produce huge quantities of anything. Industry standard

  11. #11
    Heroic Warrior Springor Spanior's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    151
    OK, OK. You've convinced me, but I wasn't suggesting that adding a machine for color was by itself the issue. I was suggesting that the mold itself contained all of the Stratos accessories, and would have been formed from one injection of one color, (say, blue) thus I thought it would be most efficient then to have another sequential production run with injection of another color (red) from that same mold.

    But if the mold is just one accessory, then yes I can see it your way. Do you have any idea how many wings would have been produced from one production run with one injection of plastic? Frankly, it doesn't have to be wings. We could be talking about anything - axes, swords, armor, etc. When the plastic cools and the entire set is popped out on runners and sprues, before they are separated from the tree, how many might we be looking at from that one production run?
    I'm losing my edge, but I was there. LCD Soundsystem

  12. #12
    Heroic Warrior Universe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    387
    Quote Originally Posted by jzguitars View Post
    The process would be seriously complicated if right and left wings were molded on the same tree because they would have to be separated for the assembly line.
    Scenario 1:
    6x machines producing 6 different Stratos pieces. 6x workers separating 6 different Stratos pieces from the injection molds and putting them into bins for assembly. 12 total workers/machines.


    Scenario 2:
    2x machines producing 6 different Stratos pieces. 2x workers separating 6 different Stratos pieces from the injection molds and putting them in separate bins for assembly. 4 total workers/machines.

    Doesn't one of these scenarios look particularly more efficient than the other?

  13. #13
    Heroic Warrior jzguitars's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Edison, NJ
    Posts
    555
    Quote Originally Posted by Springor Spanior View Post
    OK, OK. You've convinced me, but I wasn't suggesting that adding a machine for color was by itself the issue. I was suggesting that the mold itself contained all of the Stratos accessories, and would have been formed from one injection of one color, (say, blue) thus I thought it would be most efficient then to have another sequential production run with injection of another color (red) from that same mold.

    But if the mold is just one accessory, then yes I can see it your way. Do you have any idea how many wings would have been produced from one production run with one injection of plastic? Frankly, it doesn't have to be wings. We could be talking about anything - axes, swords, armor, etc. When the plastic cools and the entire set is popped out on runners and sprues, before they are separated from the tree, how many might we be looking at from that one production run?
    That's an interesting question. In my limited experiences, the number of parts on each tree is kept to a low number, like 20 per injection. More or less, depending on the part. They do this because the mold itself is extremely heavy, like weighs a ton almost literally, so they try and keep the size of the mold to a workable minimum. And it's also to keep the quality level up, it's harder to inject into a huge tree versus a smaller one. This was explained to me when I had tooling done for some of my own products (not toys) and I couldn't understand why they needed to make 3 separate molds for the parts instead of one larger mold.
    The machine closes the mold, it gets injected, coolant runs through the mold, the individual parts are popped out, and the sprue gets sent back to be remelted. That whole process takes a few seconds. I've seen these machines pump out tens of thousands of pieces per day. But that's modern computer controlled machines, not 80's technology.

    We know Mattel produced millions of figures in total, they even celebrated the 1 millionth Battle Cat in like 1984, so I would have to think the Taiwan factory alone produced a couple hundred thousand Stratos figures in the first run and probably an equal amount of red/blue vs blue/red versions. But either the production data no longer exists or Mattel isn't sharing it, so we will never know for sure. And to my knowledge, the original molds no longer exist which is why they made new molds for the commemorative line.

    WHY Mattel chose to do both color combinations? I couldn't even begin to speculate.
    Your original hypothesis would make prefect sense if that's how they produced the parts, it's not impossible but I doubt they did, which leaves us wondering what was the logic behind that decision at Mattel? Why bother to switch colors and incur any additional expense, while not extreme it still costs something to run two combinations.

    I want to try and look into this, I'd love to know the business plan behind it from Mattel.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Universe View Post
    Scenario 1:
    6x machines producing 6 different Stratos pieces. 6x workers separating 6 different Stratos pieces from the injection molds and putting them into bins for assembly. 12 total workers/machines.


    Scenario 2:
    2x machines producing 6 different Stratos pieces. 2x workers separating 6 different Stratos pieces from the injection molds and putting them in separate bins for assembly. 4 total workers/machines.

    Doesn't one of these scenarios look particularly more efficient than the other?
    Except the workers don't separate the parts from the sprue or bin them, that is all an automated process done by the machine itself. So here's the actual, and most efficient scenario

    20x machines producing one part each, the machine pops the part and loads the bin for assembly. 0 total workers/20 machines running 24/7

  14. #14
    Heroic Warrior
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,792
    From the figures I've seen, I think the colour difference was more to do with which factory produced the figure.

    And it wasn't just a case of red / blue or blue / red. The Taiwan accessories, for example, tended to be duller, whereas the French ones had a slightly more translucent 'lollipop' plastic.

    That doesn't explain why there were (broadly) two colour schemes though. It's an intriguing question.
    Vaults of Grayskull - www.vaultsofgrayskull.co.uk

  15. #15
    Heroic Warrior Springor Spanior's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by jzguitars View Post
    That's an interesting question. In my limited experiences, the number of parts on each tree is kept to a low number, like 20 per injection. More or less, depending on the part. They do this because the mold itself is extremely heavy, like weighs a ton almost literally, so they try and keep the size of the mold to a workable minimum. And it's also to keep the quality level up, it's harder to inject into a huge tree versus a smaller one. This was explained to me when I had tooling done for some of my own products (not toys) and I couldn't understand why they needed to make 3 separate molds for the parts instead of one larger mold.
    The machine closes the mold, it gets injected, coolant runs through the mold, the individual parts are popped out, and the sprue gets sent back to be remelted. That whole process takes a few seconds. I've seen these machines pump out tens of thousands of pieces per day. But that's modern computer controlled machines, not 80's technology.

    We know Mattel produced millions of figures in total, they even celebrated the 1 millionth Battle Cat in like 1984, so I would have to think the Taiwan factory alone produced a couple hundred thousand Stratos figures in the first run and probably an equal amount of red/blue vs blue/red versions. But either the production data no longer exists or Mattel isn't sharing it, so we will never know for sure. And to my knowledge, the original molds no longer exist which is why they made new molds for the commemorative line.
    Thanks for posting this, jzguitars. This is really informative. In truth, this sort of information about the molds is what I’m really interested in, and not so much why Stratos came in two color combinations. In fact, my hypothesis was simply a byproduct of my imagination of how these things might have been produced from the molds. On a different thread, I posted a long treatise about the He-Man #17 axe and its evolution from USA to Taiwan to Malaysia to India. I am of the firm opinion that the molds were moved from location to location because that was cheaper than making a new mold. In fact, my new hypothesis is that the final resting place for many of the original molds was India. Whether they are still there is anyone’s guess.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by VaultsofGrayskull View Post
    From the figures I've seen, I think the colour difference was more to do with which factory produced the figure.

    And it wasn't just a case of red / blue or blue / red. The Taiwan accessories, for example, tended to be duller, whereas the French ones had a slightly more translucent 'lollipop' plastic.

    That doesn't explain why there were (broadly) two colour schemes though. It's an intriguing question.
    VaultsofGrayskull - Thanks for the comment. It is interesting that many of the France productions have brighter and deeper colors, both in terms of the plastic used as well as the paint applications. But as interesting as that is, I find it even more interesting that Mattel seemingly commissioned new molds for the France productions. As far as I can tell, Mattel did not re-use molds in France, which makes them all the more fascinating and unique. We see this in so many ways - most notably the Man-At-Arms with the cuff on the wrist armor, but also the unique shape of the He-Man shield (also re-purposed for Stinkor) and finally the fact that they molded a He-Man sword that also served as Skeletor’s sword as well - both coming from the same mold with He-Man’s 5040 SKU.

    This is in stark contrast to Aurimat, which both re-used molds and also simply utilized production from other countries like Malaysia and Hong Kong. Take, for example, the Aurimat production of Faker. Look at this Faker and it’s accessories, and it’s clear this is a Hong Kong Faker. The sword is a Hong Kong #23 sword, produced from the same mold that made the sword that came with Hong Kong Skeletor sold in the US. And I think it's totally cool, by the way, but when I think about Aurimat Faker, I really group it with other Hong Kong productions. It is not a Mexico production, in my mind. The France Faker, on the other hand, is truly a unique production. But who really cares, right? As long as it looks cool.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Random thought: When Mattel lengthened the straps on the armor of the initial line of MOTU character accessories, did they have to make new molds, or were they able to modify the original molds to accommodate the longer straps? It seems like they must have been able to modify the original molds, I think, because when you look at a number 5, 10 or 15 Taiwan He-Man harness (all of which were made in short strap version), the corresponding long strap version for each one has the exact same etching (of the COO and production numbers) as its direct predecessor.
    I'm losing my edge, but I was there. LCD Soundsystem

  16. #16
    Heroic Warrior Night Stalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,147
    Lengthening the straps would have only needed a modification of the original mold. It wouldn't have been cost effective to strike a new mold just for that.
    Most wanted Origins figures: Mighty Spector, Fisto's Cousin's Babysitter, and Mer-Man's Seventh Grade Crush.

  17. #17
    Heroic Warrior ToyCulture's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    157
    Quote Originally Posted by jzguitars View Post
    Why wouldn't they run a tree of just wings, and just jetpacks in the colors they need?
    Case closed.

  18. #18
    Heroic Warrior PetezorIII's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    114
    Quote Originally Posted by Springor Spanior View Post

    This is in stark contrast to Aurimat, which both re-used molds and also simply utilized production from other countries like Malaysia and Hong Kong. Take, for example, the Aurimat production of Faker. Look at this Faker and it’s accessories, and it’s clear this is a Hong Kong Faker. The sword is a Hong Kong #23 sword, produced from the same mold that made the sword that came with Hong Kong Skeletor sold in the US. And I think it's totally cool, by the way, but when I think about Aurimat Faker, I really group it with other Hong Kong productions. It is not a Mexico production, in my mind.
    This is absolutely not true. Aurimat Faker is not made in Hong Kong.

  19. #19
    Heroic Warrior Springor Spanior's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    151
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/COLLECTION-...DEL-UNIVERSO-M


    OK. The back of the Faker figure in this Aurimat listing has the signature stamp on the torso like a Hong Kong figure, whereas other figures clearly have a Mexico stamp on the torso. And although the sword is not pictured, I have seen numerous Aurimat Faker swords, and they are explicitly stamped Hong Kong, and they are definitely made from the same mold as the Hong Kong Skeletor sword sold in the US.

    I would also suggest that Aurimat Fisto is a Malaysia production, while the sword / katana is a Hong Kong production. There appears to be nothing on the Aurimat Fisto that was actually made in Mexico.

    Aurimat seemed to mix and match stuff.
    I'm losing my edge, but I was there. LCD Soundsystem

  20. #20
    Heroic Warrior PetezorIII's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    114
    Quote Originally Posted by Springor Spanior View Post
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/COLLECTION-...DEL-UNIVERSO-M


    OK. The back of the Faker figure in this Aurimat listing has the signature stamp on the torso like a Hong Kong figure, whereas other figures clearly have a Mexico stamp on the torso. And although the sword is not pictured, I have seen numerous Aurimat Faker swords, and they are explicitly stamped Hong Kong, and they are definitely made from the same mold as the Hong Kong Skeletor sword sold in the US.

    I would also suggest that Aurimat Fisto is a Malaysia production, while the sword / katana is a Hong Kong production. There appears to be nothing on the Aurimat Fisto that was actually made in Mexico.

    Aurimat seemed to mix and match stuff.
    Incorrect. All Aurimat is made in Mexico, regardless of what COO they have on them. Example, Aurimat Clawful made in Mexico is marked Malaysia.

  21. #21
    Heroic Warrior Springor Spanior's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by PetezorIII View Post
    Incorrect. All Aurimat is made in Mexico, regardless of what COO they have on them. Example, Aurimat Clawful made in Mexico is marked Malaysia.
    I never said the figures were not "made" in Mexico - the box packaging says they were, after all. The figures were presumably assembled and given paint applications in Mexico, but some of them were assembled using parts and accessories that appear to have been sourced from outside of Mexico. That's what I'm saying.
    I'm losing my edge, but I was there. LCD Soundsystem

  22. #22
    Heroic Warrior PetezorIII's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    114
    Quote Originally Posted by Springor Spanior View Post
    I never said the figures were not "made" in Mexico - the box packaging says they were, after all. The figures were presumably assembled and given paint applications in Mexico, but some of them were assembled using parts and accessories that appear to have been sourced from outside of Mexico. That's what I'm saying.
    Nothing was sourced from outside of Mexico. What you're saying is wrong.

  23. #23
    Heroic Warrior Springor Spanior's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by PetezorIII View Post
    Nothing was sourced from outside of Mexico. What you're saying is wrong.
    This is reminiscent of conversations I used to have with my German professors, where the response was a terse "Falsch!", with me left to figure out the error of my ways.

    If nothing was sourced outside of Mexico, then it would seem that Mattel sent a bunch of molds to Mexico to be used in production there, but the etching in the molds was never modified to state that Mexico was the source of production. Wrong? Incorrect? What happened then?
    I'm losing my edge, but I was there. LCD Soundsystem

  24. #24
    Heroic Warrior PetezorIII's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    114
    Quote Originally Posted by Springor Spanior View Post

    If nothing was sourced outside of Mexico, then it would seem that Mattel sent a bunch of molds to Mexico to be used in production there, but the etching in the molds was never modified to state that Mexico was the source of production. Wrong? Incorrect? What happened then?
    That is exactly what happened

  25. #25
    Heroic Warrior Springor Spanior's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by PetezorIII View Post
    That is exactly what happened
    Thank you, Herr Doktor Professor!
    I'm losing my edge, but I was there. LCD Soundsystem

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •